All Sorts of Weird Stuff: News

All Sorts of Weird Stuff offers news and information about George R.R. Martin, in particular about his A Song of Ice and Fire series.

"When I was young, I read all sorts of stuff. One week it would be Lovecraft, the next Vance. It was all imaginative literature, or as my dad called it 'Weird Stuff.' It was all 'Weird Stuff.'"

George R.R. Martin

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Sites of Interest
Feast for Crows Simonetti Cover

Following on our previous report, it’s been pointed out to us that Marc Simonetti’s Deviant Gallery also includes a fourth cover painting for A Feast for Crows. The artist seems to have gone to town with these, focusing on strong, evocative color choices. The image, and more information about the “A Song of Ice and Fire” publishing situation in France as well as Marc Simonetti, can be found below:


Greyjoy’s castle, ASOIAF… by *MarcSimonetti on deviantART

According to a commenter on Adam Whitehead’s The Wertzone, the publishing situation really is quite confusing. To quote:

“French, books are not split in 3 as a rule, they’re just split and you never know in how many volumes. AGoT was split in 2. ACoK in 3. ASoS in 4. AFfC in 3. So that’s 12 volumes, but “3 volumes per book” only on average. The problem is that recently there’s been an “integral” edition (by [Pygmalion]), those who do the TP edition, while J’ai Lu does the MMPB (there’s no HC)), and the new volumes were made exactly of 3 former volumes. So we had for the first book all of AGoT, plus 1/3 of ACoK.”

So it seems J’ai Lu will be publishing new integral editions that actually follow the way the original novels were published, instead of Pygmalion’s strange integral editions.

Finally, Dark Wolf Fantasy Reviews published an interview with Simonetti in April. While it does not discuss his “A Song of Ice and Fire” work specifically, it’s an interesting look into his career and methods.

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