Blood of Dragons: Articles

Blood of Dragons is the only author-approved MUSH based on George R.R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire. Play the Game of Thrones and become a part of the history of the Seven Kingdoms:

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Thematic Odds and Ends

This article serves as a way to collect miscellaneous notes regarding common misconceptions and errors on relatively minor matters that still contribute to the verisimilitude of the game. Hence, it is something of a FAQ for thematic odds and ends.

Things we don’t have

  • Chocolate
  • Coffee
  • Mirrors with silvered glass. The very best and most expensive mirrors are made in Myr, but they use tin and mercury for the reflective backing. Glass mirrors made elsewhere are costly but use less-reflective amalgams as backings. Most mirrors would likely be polished metal and none of them would give a very good reflection.
  • Potato
  • Tea made from tea leaves. Herbal teas exist, however.
  • Tomato

What we call things

  • Avoid modern expressions such as “OK”, “okay”, “damnit/dammit”, etc.
  • Don’t use expressions from other languages than English even if they are acceptable loan-words in modern English. For example, don’t use femme fatale, carte blanche or any number of French terms associated with food.
  • Don’t use terminology that cannot exist in Westeros. For example, don’t describe a hairstyle as a “french braid”.
  • Everyone in Westeros is Westerosi, including the Dornish. In the books, Westerosi is used by foreigners to speak of the inhabitants of Westeros. It might be used by someone from Westeros to contrast themselves with people from Essos or elsewhere. But the Dornish should not speak of people from the Seven Kingdoms as Westerosi. Instead, the Dornish should refer to anyone north of them as northrons, much like the North uses southrons to refer to everyone south of them.
  • When speaking of an illness, make sure not to use modern names and terminology. If a name for the illness isn’t given in the books, just describe it using the symptoms.