The Citadel: Concordance

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2.7. Clothing
  • Sable furs are used as expensive trimmings (I: 2)
  • Moleskin is used for gloves (I: 2)
  • In the heat of the summer, women often wear little more than short gowns of silk or cotton, thinly cut (I: 34)
  • Silk of many hues (I: 27, 42, etc.)
  • Satin cloaks (I: 42)
  • Chokers (I: 42)
  • Embroidery (I: 42, etc.)
  • Velvet (I: 43, etc.)
  • Squires and servants wear livery according to the house they serve (I: 61)
  • Knights wear surcoats (I: 61, etc)
  • Fur cloaks (I: 91)
  • One hundred gold dragons are far too much for a wolf pelt (I: 131)
  • Vest of woven gold (I: 145)
  • Loose gowns of silk (I: 145)
  • Pointed slippers of soft velvet (I: 145)
  • Velvet doublets with embroidery (I: 161)
  • Cloth-of-gold half capes (I: 161)
  • Woolen scarves (I: 177)
  • Light linen undertunics (I: 231)
  • Doublets that lace up the back (I: 233)
  • Black velvet coats (I: 235)
  • Linen doublets (I: 265)
  • A doublet sewn with pearls (I: 285)
  • Slashed velvet doublets (I: 299. III: 291)
  • Cloaks trimmed with black fox (I: 299)
  • Trousers (I: 318)
  • Sachets filled with fragrances sewn to tunic sleeves (I: 324)
  • A surcoat with silver buttons (I: 337)
  • Fools wear motley (I: 362)
  • Women wear underskirts (I: 398)
  • Damask gowns (I: 398)
  • Hunting greens (I: 405)
  • Velvet tunics with puffed sleeves (I: 427)
  • Smallclothes (I: 449)
  • Dresses of wool, plainly cut but richly embroidered around collar and sleeves, might be worn by noblewomen (I: 453)
  • Mourning clothes are black (I: 455)
  • Robes of thick velvet with golden fastenings and fur collars, sleeves heavy with scrollwork (I: 517)
  • Velvet doublets sewn with scales (I: 519)
  • Greatcloak (I: 572)
  • Sleeved surcoats are used (I: 585)
  • Whores might wear wisps of painted silk (I: 604)
  • Doublet sewn with beads (I: 606)
  • Bedgowns (I: 621)
  • Felts (THK: 465)
  • Leather brigandine covered in silver studs (THK: 484)
  • Velvet doublet with long dagged sleeves (THK: 501)
  • Parts of horse barding: chinet and chamfron (THK: 515)
  • Jewelled hair nets (II: 29)
  • Cloth-of-silver garb (II: 113)
  • Samite (II: 114)
  • Oilskin pouches (II: 122)
  • A robe of heavy roughspun dyed in mottled greens and blues (II: 127, 128. IV: 19)
  • Lambswool breeches (II: 134)
  • Bleached white leather belts (II: 134)
  • Sealskin robes (II: 134)
  • Codpieces (II: 198)
  • Red-dyed leather boots ornamented with black scrollwork (II: 199)
  • Quilted breeches (II: 225)
  • A doublet with sleeves and collar trimmed with vair (II: 237)
  • Ermine mantles (II: 237)
  • Wide, floppy hats, some of them made of straw (II: 261. TSS: 79)
  • Sheepskin jerkins (II: 264)
  • Bearskin vests (II: 280)
  • A bridegroom's mantle of miniver and velvet (II: 295)
  • A tunic or doublet of slashed red velvet with black silk undersleeves (II: 326)
  • Quilted doublets (II: 346)
  • White fox fur (II: 394)
  • Bronze-colored horse trappings (II: 400)
  • A hairnet decorated with moonstones (II: 433)
  • A cloth-of-silver sash used to belt a dress (II: 466)
  • At least among noble women, a cloth is worn between the legs during menstruation (II: 554)
  • A low-cut gown baring the shoulders (II: 564)
  • A woven belt studded with gemstones (II: 564)
  • Fur-trimmed boots (II: 586)
  • A studded leather belt (II: 586)
  • A satin tunic striped black and gold (II: 586)
  • Felted black wool (II: 586)
  • A fine linen tunic worn by the son of a knight (II: 595)
  • A white linen dress with long dagged sleeves that show a lining of gold satin (II: 597)
  • Quilted jerkins (II: 653)
  • Gloves made of soft wolf-pup fur (II: 655)
  • A cloth-of-gold gown slashed in burgundy velvet (II: 662)
  • Lilac brocade (II: 662)
  • Gowns of turquoise silk and vair (II: 662)
  • Golden lace (II: 662)
  • A black mantle studded with rubies (II: 662)
  • Green velvet garb trimmed with sable (II: 663)
  • Calfskin boots (II: 679)
  • Gloves of black wool (III: 1)
  • Cruppers, crinets, and chamfrons are articles of covering for horses (III: 18)
  • A wide belt studded with nuggets of silver (III: 42)
  • Rosewater is used to scent the body (III: 65)
  • A wine-colored tunic and high boots of bleached white leather inlaid with silver scrollwork (III: 111)
  • Caps (III: 117)
  • A silver inlaid saddle (III: 124)
  • A checkered saddlecloth (III: 124)
  • Lemon is used as a scent (III: 132)
  • Tight satin breeches (III: 136)
  • A doublet of heavy black velvet, studded with lion's heads (III: 136)
  • Jasmine scent (III: 137)
  • A necklace of silver and jade with a matching pair of bracelets (III: 141)
  • A bright yellow greatcloak (III: 144)
  • Fingerless leather gloves (III: 144)
  • A gown of silk and Myrish lace, with satin linings (III: 181)
  • Hose for a woman (III: 182)
  • Kirtles and mantles (III: 182)
  • Double lambswool tunic (III: 196)
  • Thick quilted coat (III: 196)
  • A triple-thick cloak with a bone button fastening at the neck (III: 196)
  • Heavy fur mitts over thin wool-and-leather gloves (III: 196)
  • A tight-fitting fleece-lined cap to pull down over the ears beneath a hood (III: 196)
  • Wine velvet tunic (III: 208)
  • A girl's dress, of some lilac cloth, decorted with baby pearls (III: 256)
  • A brown doeskin jerkin studded with iron (III: 256)
  • Men wear rings (III: 291)
  • Jeweled cloak (III: 291)
  • A young noblewoman's hair is curled (III: 316)
  • A sharp sweet fragrance with a hint of lemon in it under the smell of flowers (III: 316)
  • Silken smallclothes (III: 316)
  • A gown of ivory samite and cloth-of-silver, lined with silvery satin. Long dagged sleeves almost touch the gown, and the bodice is slashed almost to the belly, the deep vee covered over with a panel of ornate Myrish lace in dove-grey. The skirts are long and full, and the waist very tight. It's clearly a gown meant for a woman, not a girl (III: 316)
  • Slippers of soft grey doeskin (III: 316)
  • A costly maiden's cloak, meant for a wedding ceremony, made of velvet heavy with pearls, embroidered in silver, and fastened by a silver chain (III: 317)
  • Black velvet doublet, covered with golden scrollwork (III: 318)
  • Thigh-high boots that add three inches to height (III: 318)
  • A huge and heavy crimson velvet marriage cloak, richly worked with lions and bordered with gold satin and rubies (III: 319)
  • Girdles and undersilk are worn under a noblewomans gown (III: 324)
  • Socks (III: 369)
  • Dornish lords wear silk and satin robes with jeweled belts and flowing sleeves (III: 431)
  • Swaddling clothes for infants (III: 435)
  • A pale blue gown with a lacy bodice (III: 561)
  • Splotchy green roughspun and a soot-grey mantle with a hood (III: 568)
  • Boots that lace up (III: 610)
  • A wedding gown of ivory silk and Myrish lace, skirts decorated with floral patterns picked out in seed pearls (III: 667)
  • A maiden cloak made of a hundred cloth-of-gold roses sewn to green velvet (III: 667)
  • A doublet of dusky rose (III: 667)
  • A gown of silvery satin trimmed in vair, with dagged sleeves that almost touch the floor, lined in soft purple felt (III: 672)
  • A doublet of crimson velvet with padded shoulders and puffed sleeves slashed to show a black satin underlining (III: 672)
  • Striped black-and-crimson breeches (III: 674)
  • A cloth-of-gold doublet with black satin sleeves and onyx studs (III: 674)
  • A gown of pale green samite with a tight-laced bodice, baring shoulders and the tops of the breasts (III: 674)
  • A dress of thick brown wool, its bodice decorated with freshwater pearls (III: 686)
  • Simple and sturdy shoes with flat heels and square toes (III: 686)
  • A Dornishman's flowing robe, striped orange, yellow, and scarlet (III: 740)
  • The winter raiment of the Kingsguard are a tunic and breeches of white wool and a heavy white cloak (III: 750)
  • A long yellow surcoat (III: 797)
  • A low cut white gown, baring shoulders and the tops of the breasts, decorated with swirls and spirals of tiny emeralds at the bodice and the ends of the wide sleeves (III: 822)
  • A dress of blue lambswool over a linen shift and silken smallclothes, a pair of hose, boots that lace to the knee, heavy leather gloves, and a hooded cloak of soft white fox fur worn by a young lady against the cold (III: 901)
  • A blue velvet robe trimmed with fox fur (III: 903)
  • A gold arm ring (III: 907)
  • A belt studded with moonstones (III: 907)
  • A fine tunic from Dorne, made of sandsilk and painted with heraldic achievments (TSS: 107)
  • Septas wear white robes (TSS: 117)
  • A gown of dark blue damask trimmed with Myrish lace, with long hems that trail on the ground (TSS: 117)
  • A horse's caprison and a woman's cape made up of silverly silk strands, to look like webs (TSS: 145)
  • A ring of onyx and gold, bearing a royal signet (TSS: 148)
  • A brooch shaped like a spider, of ivory and with legs of silver, with crushed garnets making spots on its back (TSS: 155)
  • A doublet of satin striped in green and gold, worn with a black silk half cape pinned at the shoulder with a jade brooch (IV: 7)
  • A sealskin clout (IV: 18)
  • A mottled sandsilk cloak of dun and gold worn in Dorne (IV: 31)
  • Worn riding clothes of brown leather (IV: 31)
  • A billowing cloak of dun-and-yellow sandsilk worn in Dorne (IV: 37)
  • Shimmering lilac robes and great silk cape of cream and copper worn in Dorne (IV: 38)
  • Snakeskin sandals laced to the thighs worn in Dorne (IV: 41)
  • A band of copper suns worn around the brow (IV: 41)
  • A jeweled girdle and loose layers of flowing purple silk and yellow samite, worn in Dorne (IV: 41)
  • A gown of pale blue samite with sleeves of Myrish lace (IV: 42)
  • A spiked doeskin jerkin (IV: 58)
  • A quilted doublet of charcoal-colored wool (IV: 112)
  • The robes of septons are belted with woven belts of seven plaits, each a different color (IV:124)
  • Brothers of the Faith wear robes of various hues, such as brown, butternut, dun, or even undyed roughen (IV: 124)
  • Sky blue breeches and a white tunic with puffed sleeves (IV: 153)
  • Layered linen robes worn in Dorne, the hooded outer robe of turquoise stripes and golden suns , and the lighter inner robe in orange. Beneath that, a striped silk undertunic is worn (IV:185, 192)
  • A winding bracelet shaped like a serpent, with gold and copper scales (IV: 189)
  • A plush yellow doublet worked with beads of lapis (IV: 241)
  • A simply cut gown of brown lambswool, with vine and leaf embroidery on the bodice, sleeves, and hem in golden embroidery, worn with a ribbon of autumn gold velvet about the neck (IV: 336)
  • A gown of alternating stripes of shining green satin and plush black velvet, and intricate, costly black Myrish lace above the bodice (IV: 356)
  • A gown of jade green silk with sleeves of silver Myrish lace (IV: 391)
  • A golden chain with an emerald the size of a pigeon's egg (IV: 391)
  • A Dornish noblewoman's most revealing garments, wisps of silk that covered everything and hid nothing (IV: 589)
  • A simple Dornish gown of ivory linen, with vines and purple grapes embroidered around the sleeves and bodice (IV: 597)
  • A young lady's winter garments: woolen hoose beneath skirts over a double layer of small clothes, a lambswool overtunic, a hooded fur cloak, a scarf, and a pair of fur-lined leather gloves (IV: 613)
  • A white bearskin cloak (IV: 614)
  • A quartered gown of silk brocade, featuring a house's quartered arms (IV: 632)
  • A soft woolen dress covering from throat to ankle, with a few small vines embroidered on the bodice and sleeves embroided in golden thread (IV: 647)
  • An ivory gown with freshwater pearls on the bodice (IV: 649)
  • A necklace of golden seashells (IV: 661)
  • Torn clothing as a mark of mourning (IV: 663)
  • A doublet of dark blue silk edged in gold satin (TMK: 654)
  • A cloak with a pocket large enough to hold half a roast capon (TMK: 675)
  • A white silk doublet with dagged sleeves lined with red satin, so long their points droop past the knees, and a heavy silver chain studded with huge, dark amethysts (TMK: 675)
  • A damask tunic (TMK: 692)
  • A boy's clothing consisting of burgundy breeches and a blue velvet doublet lined with cloth-of-gold (V: 25)
2.7.1. Arms and Armor
  • Ring-mail armor is worn with boiled leather, and wool in cold weather (I: 2)
  • Weapons such as longswords might be ostentatiously decorated with gemstones and precious metals (I: 5, etc.)
  • Common warriors may use short swords, double-bladed axes, bows, and other weapons (I: 2, 5, etc.)
  • Dirks are one kind of dagger (I: 6)
  • Nothing holds an edge like Valyrian steel (I: 12, 147)
  • Valyrian steel is folded hundreds of times in the process of forging (I: 20)
  • Daggers, swords, and greatswords exist that are made of Valyrian steel (I: 20, etc.)
  • Gilded swords (I: 25)
  • Warhammers are used (I: 36)
  • Bejewelled plate armor (I: 36, 263)
  • Tourney blades have blunted edges (I: 62)
  • Plate armor is worn (I: 74)
  • Helms may have visors, and can be shaped as animal heads or other fanciful shapes (I: 74)
  • The bravos of the Free Cities use slender swords, edged and balanced for the thrust (I: 81)
  • The Dothraki use long, curved swords called arakhs (I: 85)
  • A fine dagger of Valyrian steel, with a dragonbone hilt, would not go unnoticed in a place like King's Landing (I: 114, 115)
  • Intricate suits of scale armor (I: 120)
  • Steel plate of deep forest green, the armor put in the metal itself (a rare skill) rather than enamel or paint (I: 120, 235)
  • Iron chainmail over layers of boiled leather (I: 121)
  • A blued steel sword (I: 124)
  • Spears tipped with iron (I: 178)
  • Arms makers have a mark to proclaim their work on the items they produce (I: 185)
  • Morningstar (I: 188)
  • Padded doublets (I: 219)
  • Wood-and-leather shields (I: 219)
  • Silvered steel plate armor, with jasper and mother-of-pearl ornamentation (I: 232)
  • Some armors are made by men trained in the Free Cities, where some of them know how to put color directly into metal (I: 235)
  • Paint is used on armors (I: 235)
  • Some to claim to still know the spells that must be used to rework Valyrian steel, and some master armorers have revealed their ability to properly reforge it (I: 235. III: 359. SSM: 1)
  • Ancient bronze armor, engraved with runes that are supposed to ward the wearer from harm (I: 246)
  • Plate enamelled in many colors (I: 249)
  • Gorgets are fastened to helms and armor (I: 248, 253)
  • Gilded ringmail (I: 261)
  • Horse armor (I: 261)
  • A lance made of golden wood from the Summer Isles, possibly of the fabled goldenheart (I: 261. IV: 6)
  • Tourney lances are made to break (I: 263)
  • Extremely skilled archers can shoot a small target accurately at 100 paces (I: 265)
  • The Braavosi style of fighting is flamboyant (I: 266)
  • Pot helms with narrow slits for the eyes (I: 279)
  • Helms decorated with silken plumes (I: 279)
  • Peasants, clansmen, and brigands might use old spears and swords, sharpened scythes, spiked clubs, and mauls (I: 280)
  • Miniature swords for children (I: 285)
  • Silvered ringmail (I: 309)
  • Gauntlets and greaves (I: 320)
  • Dothraki bows outrange those of the Seven Kingdoms (I: 325)
  • Broadhead arrows (I: 332)
  • Coifs (I: 332)
  • Heavy plate armor over mail and padded surcoat. Large rondels protect the juncture of arm and breast. (I: 365)
  • Skirts of lobstered metal covering to mid-thigh (I: 365)
  • Solid gorgets (I: 365)
  • A helm with a beaked visor (I: 365)
  • Round halfhelms with nasal guards (I: 365)
  • Boots with steel shinguards and gloves sewn with discs of black iron (I: 365)
  • Heavy triangular shields, almost four feet tall, made of heavy oak and studded with iron (I: 366)
  • Engraved swords (I: 366)
  • Oilstones are used to sharpen blades (I: 381)
  • The spears of the City Watch are topped by black iron heads (I: 440)
  • Steel codpieces (I: 446)
  • Pikes (I: 475)
  • Crossbows (I: 508)
  • Outriders tend to be in leather and mail (I: 534)
  • Swords tapered to thrust as well as cut, incised with three fullers (I: 546)
  • Carved stone pommels weighted with lead for swords (I: 546)
  • Bastard swords or hand-and-a-half swords (I: 546)
  • Visored, flat-topped greathelms (I: 556)
  • Pointed steel boots (I: 570)
  • A shield of ironwood, banded with steel (I: 571)
  • Archers wear their quivers on their belts (I: 571)
  • Greathelm with roaring, clawing lion crest all in gold (I: 572)
  • Spears can be thrown (I: 575)
  • Oval shields reinforced with iron studs, used by footmen (I: 577)
  • Burnished, bronzed steel plate (I: 578)
  • Mail gloves (I: 585)
  • Iron cudgels used by the City Watch (I: 600)
  • Black lacquered, gold-filigreed armor (I: 606)
  • The children of the forest used knives, leaf-shaped spear heads, and arrows made of obsidian (which is also known to smallfolk as dragonglass (I: 616. II: 378. IV: 10)
  • Spiked maces (I: 665)
  • Eight-foot war lances of turned ash, banded against splitting (THK: 459, 520)
  • Blunted longaxes for tournaments (THK: 463)
  • Fantastic helmets shaped like birds and beasts, chased with precious metals (THK: 466)
  • A new hauberk of mail, gorget, greaves, and greathelm made by a good smith can cost 800 silver stags (THK: 466)
  • Offering to trade old armor to be salvaged for metal can lower the price by 200 stags (THK: 466, 467)
  • Double-linked chainmail (THK: 481)
  • Greathelms with rounded tops to better deflect blows (THK: 481)
  • 12 foot tourney lances, with pennons on the ends (THK: 491)
  • An elaborate, enamelled crest for a helm (THK: 491)
  • Wealthier knights wear gilded spurs (THK: 492)
  • Tourney lances tipped with golds (THK: 497)
  • Poleaxes (THK: 497)
  • The armor of a Targaryen with black dragons teeth running across the shoulders and back of his breastplate, and the crest of his helm (THK: 516)
  • Poniard daggers (THK: 526)
  • A child's armor (II: 35)
  • A blunted silver longsword with a leaf-shaped blade made for a boy (II: 35)
  • Saddle armor (II: 36)
  • An officer of the City Watch wears a black enamelled breastplate ornamented with four golden disks (II: 65)
  • Men use oilcloth to polish armor (II: 102)
  • A suggested armor made of enamelled plate and gilded scales (II: 173)
  • Scorpions and spitfires are used in the defense of a city (II: 197)
  • Spitfires are a sort of small catapult (II: 231)
  • Sleeveless jerkins covered in scale armor (II: 241)
  • Weapons and armor used by the crannogmen of the Neck: frog spears, bronze knives, woven nets, and round leather shields (II: 241)
  • Siege engines such as mangonels, trebuchets, rams on wheels, and wheeled siege towers covered in rawhide (II: 248, 249)
  • Armor hued and enamelled to a deep cobalt color (II: 249, 251)
  • Winged helms (II: 259)
  • A short-hafted battleaxe, gold scrollwork inlaid in the black steel (II: 266-267)
  • Mauls (II: 267)
  • Throwing axes (II: 287)
  • Ungainly crossbows from Myr that can throw three quarrels at a time (II: 297)
  • A sword belt studded with chunks of black diamond (II: 347)
  • Most freeriders have poor armor, usually made of boiled leather (II: 351)
  • Armor covered in enamelled yellow sunflowers (II: 365)
  • Backplate and breastplate worn over a quilted tunics (II: 365)
  • Padded caps are worn beneath great helms (II: 366)
  • Steel caltrops are used in warfare and the defense of encampments, and can be flung with trebuchets at enemies (II: 375. III: 721)
  • Iron spikes may be set underwater to hamper crossings (II: 411)
  • Gold inlay brightening armor (II: 442)
  • Silken plumes, feathers, and wrought heraldic beasts with gemstones for eyes decorating helmets (II: 442)
  • A red-gold fox on a breastplate surrounded by a circle of lapis-lazuli flowers (II: 443)
  • Fire arrows are used (II: 480)
  • A leather jerkin sewn with overlapping iron disks (II: 488)
  • Trebuchets are made of wood, such as old oak wood, and iron banding to keep them from splitting (II: 520)
  • A leather jerkin studded with iron (II: 526)
  • Gilded mail (II: 593)
  • The pommel of a sword which is a gaping lion with a heart-shaped ruby in its mouth (II: 594)
  • Scorpions shoot out yard-long iron-headed shafts (II: 596)
  • Halberds (II: 597)
  • A long hauberk of black mail (II: 597)
  • A greatsword nearly as tall as a man (II: 597)
  • A visorless pothelm (II: 605)
  • Staves (II: 644)
  • Chainmail armor is cleaned by putting it in a barrel filled with sand and rolling the barrel around so that the sand scours any rust from the iron (II: 650)
  • Warm stockings (II: 659)
  • A spear with a silver-banded haft (II: 665)
  • Dark red enamelled plate with a rounded helm and gorget that are wrought like a screaming flayed man's face and shoulders (II: 678-679)
  • Small bows of wood-and-horn (II: 695)
  • The frog spears of the crannogmen are triple-pronged (III: 104)
  • Quilted jerkins (III: 119)
  • A studded brigantine (III: 144)
  • Pothelm (III: 153)
  • Gloves or gauntlets maid of mail (III: 157)
  • A chain worn from the neck from which a sword hangs (III: 195)
  • Mail hauberks or shirts of sewn rings are very common armor among the lords and soldiers of the North (III: 226)
  • A poleaxe, used for execution (III: 231)
  • Dornishmen, especially those from from the deserts, wrap long bright silk scarves around their helms to ward off the sun (III: 241, 430. IV: 37)
  • A costly scabbard made of cherrywood, bound in red leather and ornamented with a row of lion's-head studs in pure gold with rubies for eyes (III: 358)
  • A sword with a crossguard shape as golden lions' paws with ruby claws unsheathed (III: 358, 60)
  • A Valyrian steel sword, its blade so dark as to be nearly black as is true of most Valyrian steel weapons, but among many of the folds was a red as deep as the grey. The two colors lap together, like waves of night and blood (III: 358, 359)
  • Valyrian steel is much lighter than one might expect, because it is the only metal that can be beaten as thin as it is and still retain its strength. The ripples in the steel, a mark of steel that has been folded on itself many thousands of times, is also a hallmark (III: 358, 359)
  • Valyrian steel blades are scarce and costly, yet thousands of them remain in the world, perhaps some two hundred in the Seven Kingdoms alone (III: 359)
  • Valyrian steel can be colored with great difficulty, but it is stubborn. Some say the old swords remember and do not change easily (III: 359)
  • A gilded dagger with an ivory grip and a sapphire pommel (III: 360)
  • A rumored axe of Valyrian steel (III: 408)
  • Dornishmen favor round metal shields and short throwing spears or double-curved Dornish bows they use skillfully from horseback (III: 430)
  • Dornish lords favor armor that is heavily enameled and inlaid with burning copper, shining silver, and/or soft red gold (III: 430, 431. SSM: 1)
  • A Dornish lords armor of a shirt armored with overlapping rows of bright copper disks, a high gilded helm displaying a copper sun on the brow, and a round shield of polished metal (III: 431)
  • Bodkin point arrowheads (III: 440)
  • Crossbows are rewound (III: 440, 512)
  • Longaxes have spiked heads (III: 585)
  • A longbow of smooth, thick Dornish yew (III: 616)
  • Valyrian steel can shear right through bronze (III: 619)
  • Wooden turtles on wheels, often covered with hide to protect them from fire, can be used for sieges to protect men assaulting a gate (III: 644, 780, 781)
  • A dagger with a jewelled pommel and inlaid goldwork on the blade (III: 668)
  • A greatsword, six feet of ornate silver bright with runes, its pommel a chunk of dragonglass carved in the shape of a grinning skull with ruby eyes (III: 682)
  • Valyrian steel is always dark (III: 682)
  • Bolts for scorpions can be prepared with fire, making fire spears (III: 721)
  • A dagger with a pretty pink stone in the hilt (III: 729)
  • A kettle helm (III: 729)
  • The greatsword Dawn is far superior to normal steel (III: 753)
  • Rolling mantlets behind which several archers can hide (III: 779)
  • Dornishmen are fond of spears (III: 794)
  • A spear eight feet long of turned ash, the shaft smooth, thick, and heavy. The last two feet of the spear is steel, a slender leaf-shaped spearhead narrowing to a wicked spike with very sharp edges (III: 794)
  • The joints of plate armor are vulnerbale, with less protected places at elbows, knees, and beneath the arms (III: 794)
  • A padded leather tunic worn beneath armor (III: 795)
  • A chainmail byrnie to protect the upper body (III: 796)
  • A greathelm bolted to a gorget with breaths around the mouth and nose and a narrow slit for vision, with a crest atop of it (III: 797)
  • A spaulder, which is a piece of armor (III: 797)
  • A massive shield of oak rimmed in black iron (III: 798)
  • Jacks, a sort of armor such as freeriders, mounted bowmen, and men-at-arms might wear (III: 841. IV: 133)
  • A lion-headed mace (III: 878)
  • Lord Bloodraven and Prince Aemon the Dragonknight before him carried the Valyrian steel sword named Dark Sister (TSS: 81, 137)
  • Aegon the Conqueror and the kings after him wielded Blackfyre, a Valyrian steel sword, until Aegon IV gave it to his bastard son Daemon on his attainment of knighthood at the age 12 (TSS: 111, 137)
  • Blackfyre was the most famous Valyrian steel sword that the Targaryens possessed. It would be long lost by the time of the battle of the Trident (TSS: 111. SSM: 1)
  • A woman's close-fitting suit of scales, enameled green and chased with gold and silver (TSS: 145)
  • A longbow made of the fabled goldenheart wood of the Summer Isles. Goldenheart is the best wood with which to make bows (IV: 6. SSM: 1)
  • Dornish style arms, being a copper scale shirt befitting the rank of the captain of House Martell's guard and an iron halfhelm with a cloth wound around it (IV: 37)
  • Knights of the Kingsguard have a ceremonial suit of scale armor made of mother-of-pearl chased with gold (IV: 101)
  • Shields of linden and pine (IV: 131)
  • A tall black warhelm wrought in the shape of an iron kraken, its arms coiling down as guards across the cheek to meet under the chin (IV: 257)
  • Dornish throwing spears have short, thick shafts while fighting spears can be shorter and even thicker (IV: 293, 295. SSM: 1)
  • A triple morningstar, with three spiked heads (IV: 293)
  • The Valyrian steel sword, Lady Forlorn, owned by House Corbray. It is a longsword with a smoke-grey blade and a ruby cut in the shape of a heart in its pommel (IV: 331, 338, 341)
  • A tall helm shaped like a kraken (IV: 427)
  • The unusual heavy plate armor of an Ironborn reaver, its only weaknesses in the joints where only leather and mail provide protection (IV: 429)
  • The double-curved goldenheart bows used by Summer Islanders can send a shaft four hundred yards (IV: 523)
  • Kite shields, considered old-fashioned since the Conquest, carried by the Warrior's Sons (IV: 536.)
  • Pauldrons and poleyns of blackened steel (IV: 561)
  • Archers might smear their arrows with night soil to try and ensure that they poison those they wound with disease (IV: 566)
  • A suit of grey enameled scales (IV: 676)
  • An old-fashioned, kite-shaped shield made of pine and rimmed with iron (TMK: 653)
  • An open-faced helmet of gilded steel (TMK: 653)
  • A wildling's knife made of bone (V: 6)
  • The Targaryens had many weapons of Valyrian steel (SSM: 1. SFC)
  • Plate armor is more common in the Reach, while mail is more the rule in the North, and the wildlings beyond the Wall are much more primitively armored (SSM: 1)
  • Some hems are in the style of bascinets (SSM: 1)
  • Dornishmen wear lighter armor than in the rest of the Seven Kingdoms, because of the heat (SSM: 1)
  • Dragonbone was not used in the process of making Valyrian steel (SSM: 1)
  • Valyrian steel must be made, as it cannot be found as a raw material (SSM: 1)
  • Blackfyre was a larger sword than either Dark Sister or Lady Forlon (SSM: 1)
  • Dark Sister was somewhat more slender than a typical longsword and was better-suited to a woman's hand (SSM:1)
  • Valyrian steel weapons are owned not only by great houses, but by lesser nobility who acquired them for the prestige, and even mere knights or lesser men who won them on the battlefield from fallen enemies (SSM: 1