The Citadel: Concordance

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5.1. Geography
  • The Isle of Faces in the Gods Eye holds the order of the green men, who tend the last remaining weirwoods in the south (I: 19, 617)
  • A large, three-story stone inn is not far downstream of the ruby ford on the kingsroad. It can hold perhaps 120 people. It was originally called the Old Inn, but it was a successor to other inns that had been there before it for hundreds of years. The Old Inn was raised in the reign of King Jaehaerys, who is said to have stayed there with his queen during their journies. The inn was known as the Two Crowns in their honor. Then a belltower was built, and it was known as the Bellringer Inn. Later a crippled knight, Long John Heddle, took it over wen he was to old to fight. Taking up ironworking, he made a sign for the inn, a black iron three-headed dragon which clanked in the wind and earned the inn a new name, the Clanking Dragon. When his son was old, Daemon Blackfyre rose in rebellion, and the black iron dragon was cut down by Lord Darry, who was fiercely loyal to King Daeron II and ruled the area. The inn became known as the River Inn, as the river was right up against it and some of the rooms were built over the water. The river changed its course in the 220th or 230th year (I: 117. IV: 548)
  • The ruby ford (probably named so after Rhaegar's death) is at at a bend of the Green Fork of the Trident (I: 124)
  • The Darry lands and castle are half a day's ride south of the Trident (I: 128)
  • It takes two weeks to ride from the Trident to King's Landing (I: 164)
  • There is an inn at the crossroads north of the confluence of the Trident (I: 239)
  • The inn sits across from a marketplace, and a village with half a hundred white cottages surrounding a small sept is a mile further north (I: 241)
  • Along the Green Fork are fertile valleys and green woodlands, thriving towns and strong holdfasts and the castles of the river lords (I: 241)
  • The towns and villages of Sherrer, Wendish Town, and Mummer's Ford (I: 387)
  • The holdfast of Wendish Town is timbered, while that of Sherrer is of stone (I: 388)
  • The Mummer's Ford is upriver of Sherrer (I: 388)
  • There's no crossing on the Green Fork south of the Twins until the ruby ford (I: 505)
  • A small pinched valley called the Whispering Wood, a stream running its rocky way along its floor. It is south of the Blue Fork (I: 581, 582, 660. III: 518)
  • There are roads which lead north through the riverlands besides the kingsroad, but many are narrow and little more than unmaintained ruts through weeds. Traffic on these is small (II: 101)
  • The land south of the God's Eye is made up of rolling hills, terraced fields, meadows, woodlands, and valleys where willows crowd near slow and shallow streams (II: 101)
  • Cutting west away from the kingsroad, south of the God's Eye, the land is more forested, the villages and holdfasts smaller and further apart, and the hills are higher while the valleys are deeper (II: 102)
  • A holdfast named Briarwhite (II: 103)
  • Some eight or nine hours south of the place where the God's Eye meets the river, a covered wooden bridge can be found (II: 157)
  • There is a town where the God's Eye and its river meet, with a stone holdfast and a towerhouse for its lord (II: 157)
  • On the north edge of the God's Eye is Harrentown (II: 157)
  • A river track runs along the east side of the river flowing from the God's Eye, although it's use is not difficult for all that it is unpaved (II: 157)
  • The God's Eye is so large that the far shore cannot be seen from its edge (II: 158)
  • The town where the God's Eye and the river meet is made up of white houses spread out around the walls of the holdfast, a large sept with a shingled wooden roof, and the lord's towerhouse on a small rise to the west. There is an inn built on pilings directly over the water of the lake, and docks to east and west of it (II: 158)
  • The town's holdfast has gates studded with iron nails, which can be barred from within bars of iron the size of saplings which fit into post holes in the ground and metal brackets on the gate; when slotted through the brackets, the bars make a large X brace (II: 160)
  • The walls of the holdfast are of rough unmortared stone some teen feet high, with a wooden catwalk inside the battlements. There is a postern gate to the north (II: 160)
  • Within the holdfast, an old wooden barn large enough to have held half the animals in the town, has a trap which leads to a tunnel. The tunnel is long and damp, and opens near the lake (II: 160)
  • The holdfast's haven is even larger than the barn, built of stone (II: 160)
  • There is a large kitchen in the holdfast (II: 160)
  • The towerhouse of the lord of the town on the edge of the God's Eye has only one entrance, a second-story door that can only be reached by a ladder (II: 213)
  • Along the eastern shore of the God's Eye there are many villages, farms, castles, septs, and barns (II: 213)
  • Village roofs of thatch, and a rare one with slate roofing (II:2 15)
  • Harrenhal is near the fords of the Trident which provide access to the lands south of it (II: 235)
  • Marching north following the shore of the God's Eye, there comes a point where the trees thin and give way to rolling hills, meandering streams, sunlit fields, and various holdfasts. Another day's march will bring Harrenhal to view, hard against the lake (II: 307)
  • Just west of Harrenhal is a town, probably Harrentown (II: 308)
  • There's a place called the Rushing Falls (II: 336)
  • There is a for upstream of Riverrun on the Red Fork, where the river makes a wide loop and the water becomes muddy and shallow (II: 411)
  • South of Riverrun the land is open and flat for miles (II: 479)
  • From a tower in Riverrun, the nearest of the fords of the Red Fork is just barely visible miles to the south (II: 479)
  • There are more than four fords on the Red Fork upriver of Riverrun (II: 479, 481)
  • The west bank of the Red Fork is higher than the east and well wooded (II: 480)
  • There is a ford six leagues to the south of Riverrun (II: 481)
  • A place called Stone Mill on the Red Fork (II: 483)
  • An army might march from the upriver fords of the Red Fork to the headwaters of the Blackwater Rush in about 5 days times (II: 484)
  • The villages of Hag's Mire and Sevenstreams, in the Frey lands, lie at the very beginning of the Blue Fork and can be gone through to go around the river (III: 5, 6, 518)
  • The southern bank of the Red Fork is rich with smooth red clay, while the northern bank is wilder wth highy rocky bluffs rising up twenty feet and crowned with stands of beech, oak, and chestnut (III: 19)
  • The forks of the Trident are the easiest way to move goods or men across the riverlands. In times of peace fisherfolk in skiffs, grain barges poled downstream, merchants on floating ships, and even brightly painted mummer's boats with quilted sails of many colors could be found on the rivers (III: 20)
  • The Red Fork is wide and slow, a meandering river of loops and bends dotted with small wooded islets and often choked by sandbars and snags (III: 20)
  • River galleys with as many as eighteen oars can navigate the Red Fork (III: 23)
  • There are woods and streams not far north of Harrenhal (III: 35)
  • The land north of Harrenhal grows progressively hillier (III: 39)
  • There are several rivers between Harrenhal and the Trident: the Darry, the Greenapple, the Maiden, the Little Willow, the Big Willow, Rippledown Rill, and perhaps others (III: 39, 40)
  • The Little Willow flows into the Big Willow, which in turn flows into the Trident (III: 40)
  • Rippledown Rill loops around and flows towards Harrenhal and the God's Eye (III: 40)
  • There is a large inn hugging the south bank of the Red Fork at the point in which the river bends southeastwards. The main building is two stories, made of grey stone on the lower and of whitewashed wood on the upper, with the roof made of slate. There are stables, a smithy, an arbor heavy with vines, apples trees, and a small garden. At the end of it's dock is sign hanging from an iron post that represents a king upon his knees with his hands together in the gesture of fealty. The inn is named the Inn of the Kneeling Man, and is said to stand on the spot where the last King of the North offered his submission to Aegon the Conqueror (III: 120, 125, 148)
  • The Red Fork can be sailed down its entire length, allowing access as far as Maidenpool (III: 123)
  • More than thirty miles downriver from the Inn of the Kneeling Man but before the ruby ford are the Skipping Stones and Red Deer Island (III: 123)
  • Six miles downstream from the Inn of the Kneeling Man is a village, where the road spits. Turning south from there one will come across a stone towerhouse, while continuing on the road leads through the woods south by east (III: 125, 126)
  • The Red Fork is very broad where it bends southeastwards, but shallow, its banks all mud and reeds (III: 126)
  • A mile or two southeast from the Inn of the Kneeling there's a brook that flows into the Trident (III: 148)
  • Lambswold (III: 151)
  • The Trident is generally muddy (III: 151)
  • Tumbler's Falls is on the Blackwater Rush (III: 164)
  • Maidenpool is a town (III: 235)
  • From Maidenpool one can take the Duskendale road south (III: 236)
  • There is a shallow brook not far from Maidenpool to the south (III: 239)
  • The small square keep of House Lychester has a little stone bridge behind it (III: 246)
  • The Hayford road is some three days ride from the keep of the Lychesters (III: 247)
  • The village of Sallydance is some four days ride from the keep of the Lychesters. It has a sept with windows of leaded glass and icons of the Seven with the Mother wearing costly robes, the Crone carrying a gilded lantern, and the Father wearing a silver crown. They have eyes of jet, lapis, and mother-of-pearl. . There is a vault beneath the sept where wine and other things were kept (III: 247)
  • High Heart is a huge hill a day's ride from Sallydance. About its top stand the stumps of thirty-one once-mighty weirwoods, so wide around that a child could use one for a bed. It is so tall that its peak is above low-lying storms (III: 249, 489)
  • The smallfolk shun High Heart, saying it was haunted by ghosts of the children who had died there when the Andal king Erreg the Kinslayer had cut down the grove (III: 249)
  • Acorn Hall is a long day's ride from High Heart (III: 251)
  • Acorn Hall is beside a brook (III: 251)
  • The Threepenny wood (III: 253)
  • Blackbottom Bend is probably near to Acorn Hall (III: 253)
  • Stoney Sept is a large town less than a fortnight from Acorn Hall. It is greater than the castleton of Harrenhal, and is walled for its protection. Its sept stands upon a hill, with a stout holdfast of grey stone below it that seems too small for such a large town. It was the site of the Battle of the Bells during Robert's War (III: 253, 327, 328)
  • Stoney Sept is near the Blackwater Rush (III: 328)
  • At the heart of Stoney Sept is its market square. A fountain stands there, shaped to look like a leaping trout spouting water into a shallow pool. On the east side there's a modest inn and brothel with whitewashed walls, a wooden shingle above the door painted with its namesake, a peach with a bite taken out of it; its stable sits catty-corner in relation to it (III: 328, 330, 332)
  • Stoney Sept is near to Tumbler's Falls (III: 329)
  • Somewhere in the riverlands there is a hollow hill, tangles of weirwood roots showing. It in an old place of refuge, deep and secret (III: 381)
  • Donnelwood (III: 385)
  • Sludgy Pond (III: 385)
  • Fieldstone (III: 385)
  • Mousedown Mill (III: 385)
  • Lancewood (III: 385)
  • Shermer's Grove (III: 385)
  • The Tumblestone is swift and wild, plunging like a spear into the side of the broad Red Fork at Riverrun, its blue-white current churning the muddy red-brown flow of the greater river (III: 393)
  • There is an abandoned village half a day's ride north of High Heart, with a grey stone stable. It belonged to Lord Goodbrook, but when he stayed loyal to the king even after the Tullys declared for Robert, Lord Hoster came down on him with fire and sword (III: 493, 497)
  • Acorn Hall is not far from Lord Goodbrook's burnt out village (III: 498)
  • Six miles east of Harrenhal stands the lake road which runs southwards. A few miles down that road there is a mill, now deserted (III: 501)
  • Fairmarket has a wooden bridge that crosses the Blue Fork. It is some five days ride from the Whispering Wood (III: 518)
  • Ramsford on the Blue Fork, where men and horses can cross the river (III: 518)
  • There is a bridge further upstream from Ramsford, near Oldstones. It is older than the one at Fairmarket, and smaller (III: 518)
  • There are other fords in the region of Oldstones, Ramsford, and Fairmarket (III: 519)
  • Oldstones is some eight days slow riding from Fairmarket. It is a ruined stronghold of the ancient river kings, built upon a hill overlooking the Blue Fork (III: 519)
  • Oldstones foundations remain to show where the walls and keep had stood, but long ago the stones had been quarried by local smallfolk. Its curtain wall once encircled the brow of the hill (III: 519, 920)
  • In the center of what once would have been Oldstones' yard, a great carved sepulcher still rests amidst a stand of ash and high grass. The lid is carved into the likeness of the man whose bones lay beneath it, but the rain and wind have weathered it so that only the beard can be seen obviously, the face only vaguely suggesting nose, mouth, eyes, and crown. His hands hold a stone warhammer once carved with runes that would have told its name and history, but those had been worn away over the centuries (III: 520)
  • Oldstones is the name given to the place by the local smallfolk. No one remembers its original name, when it was still a hall of kings (III: 520)
  • The castle at Oldstones was raised by Tristifer IV, King of the Rivers and the Hills, who ruled a kingdom that had stood a thousand years before the Andals came. Tristifer was killed in his hundredth battle when seven Andal kings ranged against him, and his son Tristifer V lost the realm, the castle, and then his life, ending the line of House Mudd (III: 520)
  • Sevenstreams is at least some days from Oldstones, and is named for the confusion of rills and brooks that flow into the Blue Fork (III: 523)
  • The Cape of Eagles is near Seagard (III: 525)
  • Lord Roote controls Lord Harroway's Town and the "two-headed water horse of Old King Andahar", which is a great flat-bottomed oared ferry that goes back and forth across the Trident. Harroway town has a seven-sided domed sept, an inn, many houses, and a stone roundtower holdfast (III: 538, 539, 540, 545. SSM: 1)
  • After crossing the Trident at Lord Harroway's Town, there's about a day's ride from the north bank to the kingsroad (III: 545)
  • The road connecting the eastern side of the Twins to the kingsroad runs mostly northwest, but turns west between an apple orchard and a field as it approaches the castle (III: 570)
  • Saltpans is a town with a small castle, a port, and a sept. It stands about week's ride along the Trident from the ruby ford, where the river empties into the Bay of Crabs (III: 846, 852, 853)
  • South by east from the stone inn near the ruby ford, there are weedy fields, woods, and marshes. One can ride for hours before reaching the Trident (III: 849)
  • The overgrown and stony road up to Oldstones winds twice around its hill before reaching the summit. Beneath the ruins, the lower slopes of the hill are thickly forested (III: 915)
  • Many of the people of Sevenstreams are closely related (III: 920)
  • The godswood of Oldstones is still intact (III: 921)
  • There’s at least one holy house for brothers of the Faith near Maidenpool (IV: 137)
  • The Stinking Goose is an unsavory tavern near Maidenpool’s harbor, frequented by sailors (IV: 138, 205)
  • A septry on an isle hard by the mouth of the Trident near to the town of Saltpans (IV: 176)
  • Maidenpool has at least two gates, one of which is on the east side (IV: 205)
  • Gulltown is a short sea voyage away from Maidenpool (IV: 206)
  • East of Maidenpool, the hills are wilder and covered with pine (IV: 280)
  • The coast road east from Maidenpool is the shortest, easiest way towards the Whispers. It is seldom out of sight of the bay. There are towns and villages along it, growing progressively less populace the further one travels into Crackclaw Point (IV: 280)
  • The coast road that starts east of Maidenpool eventually gives out in the northern reaches of Crackclaw Point (IV: 280)
  • A crooked track following the Bay of Crabs goes northwest from Maidenpool. The sparsely populated lands there are low wetlands with sandy dunes and salt marshes (IV: 371)
  • It's said that the tidal mudflats along the Bay of Crabs can be dangerous, with places where a man might be swallowed up if he steps wrong (IV: 373)
  • The boundary between the lands sworn to King's Landing and those sworn to Riverrun, marked by a stream, is a mere day's ride north of Sow's Horn, which in turn is perhaps a week's ride north of King's Landing (IV: 400)
  • The land immediately north of the boundary stream are ruled by the knights of House Wode, who are sworn to Harrenhal (IV: 400)
  • Half a mile from the southern shore of the Bay of Crabs, across the water from Saltpans which lies to the north, is an upthrust island crowned by a prosperous septry. The isle is known as the Quiet Isle, because the brothers are penitents who swear vows of silence. It is surrounded by tidal flats, teeming with life. When the tide is out, a winding walk can be made to reach it which might extend a mile and a half or more as one avoids quicksand (IV: 460-461)
  • The currents where the Trident empties into the Bay of Crabs are often at war with one another, so that many unusual things can be found washed up on the shores of the Quiet Isle and other places (IV: 465)
  • Saltpans was not an important port (IV: 468)
  • Before the river changes its course, there was a ferry at the inn by the crossing which carried travellers across the river so they could continue on to Lord Harroway's Town and Whitewalls (IV: 548)
  • The Trident used to move right past the old inn near its crossing, but in 220 or 230 the river changed its course (IV: 548)
  • The old inn at the crossing is west of Saltpans (IV: 548)
  • Nutten and Riverbend are two villages or towns between the old inn at the crossing and Lord Harroway's Town (IV: 552)
  • The old inn at the crossing is known as a chief crossroads, where the kingsroad, the river road following the Red Fork, and the high road into the vale meet (IV: 552-553)
  • The Tumblestone is depper and swifter than the Red Fork near Riverrun, and the nearest fording there is leagues upstream (IV: 568)
  • There is a lake some six days' ride from Stoney Sept, probably the God's Eye, which had an inn by the shore in the days of King Aerys I (TMK: 651)
  • The inn beside the lake, probably the God's Eye, is described as a large, rambling timber structure with turrets. Wooden planks along the lake shore lead to a landing for a ferry (which takes approximately more than an hour for its journey back and forth), and part of the structure is built on pylons over the water. Nearby in the woods are a ring of stumps from an ancient weirwood grove (TMK: 659, 661, 667)
  • Lord Butterwell submitted to Lord Bloodraven's judgment, and lost nine-tenths of his wealth and his pride, Whitewalls. Lord Bloodraven intended to pull the castle down and sow the ground in salt so that it would soon be forgotten (TMK: 733)
  • The riverlands lack natural defensible boundaries, compared to some other regions (SSM: 1)
5.1.1. Trade and Resources
  • In times of peace fisherfolk in skiffs, grain barges poled downstream, merchants on floating ships, and even brightly painted mummer's boats with quilted sails of many colors could be found on the rivers (III: 20)
  • With so much trade on the rivers, villagers will haul their grain and other goods to it to see it sold and carried elsewhere by the merchants (III: 126)
  • Maidenpool has a busy harbor (IV: 138, 205)
  • Fisherfolk northwest of Maidenpool fish the waters in leather coracles. Others collect clams (IV: 371-372)
  • Wine can be made from small, tart grapes grown in the riverlands (IV: 464)
  • The riverlands are rich and fertile (SSM: 1)