The Citadel: Concordance

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5.2.3. Bannerhouses
  • House Ryger, whose arms are a green willow on white (I: 241. II: 412. III: 24)
  • House Mooton (I: 241)
  • House Wode, knights sworn to Harrenhal who hold two earth-and-timber keeps just north of the stream that separates the riverland from the lands owing fealty to King's Landing (I: 276. IV: 400)
  • House Vance of Wayfarer's Rest (I: 387. III: 961)
  • House Piper of Pinkmaiden Castle, with a naked dancing maiden for their sigil (I: 257, 388. II: 412. III: 956, 960, 961. IV: 488)
  • The Pipers tend to be small (I: 388. IV: 488)
  • House Paege, ruled by a knight (II: 412. IV: 731)
  • House Grell (II: 412)
  • House Wayn (II: 412)
  • House Ryger (II: 412)
  • The Tullys can muster at least 11,000 men (and this is with the loss of men in war and the need to give some over to the harvest) (II: 416)
  • The Lothstons ruled Harrenhal before the Whents, and within living memory. The last of them was killed several generation's ago. They had a black reputation (II: 497. IV: 60)
  • House Erenford, sworn to House Frey. Their sigil is a heron (II: 739. IV: 569)
  • Ser Myles Mooton had been a squire to Prince Rhaegar, and remained his close companion after winning his knighthood from Rhaegar's own hand (III: 90)
  • The Mootons rule Maidenpool (III: 235)
  • Maidenpool takes its name from the pool where Florian the Fool was said to have first glimped Jonquil bathing with her sisters (III: 235)
  • House Lychester has a small square keep (III: 246, 247)
  • All of Lord Lychester's sons died in Robert's Rebellion, some on one side and some on the other (III: 247)
  • Acorn Hall is a great oaken keep with stone curtain walls, but even so is accounted a rather small castle. It's master is Lord Smallwood, who is vassal to Lord Vance (III: 251, 253)
  • House Charlton, sworn to house Frey. Their sigil is three springs of misteltoe (III: 385. IV: 569)
  • House Roote (III: 385)
  • The wealthy House Deddings (III: 385)
  • There is an abandoned village half a day’s ride north of High Heart, with a grey stone stable. It belonged to Lord Goodbrook, but when he stayed loyal to the king even after the Tullys declared for Robert, Lord Hoster came down on him with fire and sword (III: 493, 497)
  • House Roote controls Lord Harroway's Town and the "two-headed water horse of Old King Andahar", which is a great flat-bottomed oared ferry that goes back and forth across the Trident (III: 538, 539, 545)
  • House Vypren is a noble family (III: 564)
  • House Haigh, its emblem a pitchfork. They are sworn to House Frey (III: 564. IV: 569)
  • Myles Smallwood was renowned for courage in his day, but he was a failure as Hand to his king (III: 604)
  • House Vance of Atranta (III: 961. IV: 567)
  • At least one knight of House Smallwood fought at the Redgrass Field (TSS: 110)
  • House Butterwell, whose lord was Hand to Daeron II during the early part of the first Blackfyre Rebellion, raised a castle called Whitewalls (TSS: 110. TMK: 655)
  • Manfred Lothston betrayed Daemon Blackfyre, which may have been a pivotal factor in his defeat and death (TSS: 135)
  • Lord Lucas the Pander and his son, Manfryd of the Black Hood, were infamous Lothstons (IV: 60)
  • A story is told that Mad Danelle Lothston sent out giant black bats of Harrenhal out to collect bad children for her cooking pots (IV: 132)
  • Maidenpool has at least two gates, one of which on the east side of the town (IV: 205)
  • The Mootons have in the past attempted to send tax collectors into Crackclaw Point, despite the people there being sworn directly to the Iron Throne. If they are sent in force, a handful might return alive (IV: 283)
  • A crooked track following the Bay of Crabs goes northwest from Maidenpool. The lands there are low wetlands with sandy dunes and salt marshes (IV: 371)
  • Lord Mooton's rule extends at least a day's ride to the northwest, in the sparsely populated wetlands. The wetlands are a poor region, easily ignored in the midst of a war (IV: 372)
  • The boundary between the lands sworn to King's Landing and those sworn to Riverrun, marked by a stream, is a mere day's ride north of Sow's Horn, which in turn is perhaps a week's ride north of King's Landing (IV: 400)
  • The Knight of Saltpans is of House Cox (IV: 454, 466, 738)
  • The castle at Saltpans is a square keep within a curtain wall, built to overlook the harbor (IV: 549)
  • Lord Norbert Vance of Atranta and Ser Brynden Tully of Riverrun together served as squires to Lord Darry (IV: 567)
  • A septon preaching against Bloodraven and King Aerys, galling for an uprising in the name of the Blackfyres, was beheaded for treason and his head was displayed on a spike on the walls of Stoney Sept (TMK: 650)
  • Lord Shawney attended Lord Butterwell's wedding tourney at Whitewalls (TMK: 659)
  • It was said that Lord Butterwell had the finest vintages of wine north of the Arbor. He was said to be both very rich and very pious, with the wealth coming from cattle. Both his sons, who fought on either side of the Blackfyre Rebellion, died in the fighting, and his youngest child died during the Great Spring Sickness. This led him to take a bride from House Frey, to attempt to continue the family name (TMK: 662)
  • Ser Morgan Dunstable of Tumbler's Falls, in the reign of Aerys I (TMK: 663)
  • After guesting at Lord Butterwells's castle for a night and allegedly impregnating his host's three maiden daughters, King Aegon IV the Unworthy gave him the gift of a dragon's egg. Butterwell's grandson, the new Lord Butterwell, would make it the prize at his wedding tourney at Whitewalls (TMK: 663)
  • Lord Shawney fought on the right with Bittersteel at the Battle of the Redgrass Field, and was nearly killed there (TMK: 667)
  • Whitewalls was a new castle early in the reign of Aerys I, only forty years old and raised by the grandsire of the Lord Butterwell of that time. The smallfolk called it the Milkhouse, because all of its walls and towers were wrought in finely dress white stone brought from the Vale at great expense. Its floors and pillars were white marble veined with gold, and the rafters were carved from the trunks of weirwoods (TMK: 669)
  • In the reign of Aerys I, the Freys married a daughter of the family to Lord Butterwell, who had been left without heirs after the Blackfyre Rebellion and the Great Spring Sickness. It's claimed that this marriage happened because Lord Frey's daughter had been caught abed with a scullion by her young brother, the heir Walder Frey, who screamed when he saw them in congress (TMK: 662, 679)
  • Lord Butterwell's sons fought on both sides during the first Blackfyre Rebellion (TMK: 687)
  • Lord Smallwood's nephew broke his wrist during Lord Butterwell's wedding tourney in the reign of Aerys I (TMK: 694)
  • The red-haired Mad Danelle Lothston, wearing close-fitted black armor, came in strength to Whitewalls with the host raised by Lord Bloodraven (TMK: 731)
  • Lord Butterwell submitted to Lord Bloodraven's judgment, and lost nine-tenths of his wealth and his pride, Whitewalls. Lord Bloodraven intended to pull the castle down and sow the ground in salt so that it would soon be forgotten (TMK: 733)
5.2.3.1. The Freys of the Twins
  • The lord of the House is styled Lord of the Crossing (I: 533)
  • The Freys can gather nearly 4,000 soldiers (I: 533)
  • The Freys have held the crossing for six hundred years and grown wealthy on the fees for making use of their bridge (I: 535)
  • The bridge of the Twins is a massive arch of grey rock wide enough for two wagons to cross abreast. The Water Tower rises in the middle and commands road and river with arrow slits, murder holes, and portcullises (I: 535)
  • It had taken the Freys three generations to complete their bridge. When they finished, they raised stout wooden keeps at either end (I: 535)
  • Now the ends of the bridge are defended by squat, ugly, formidable castles that look exactly alike; high curtain walls, moats, oak-and-iron gates, the bridge footings starting from the inner keeps, barbicans and portcullises on either bank. The arrangement has been so for centuries (I: 535, 536)
  • The seat of the Freys is a tall chair of black oak, the back carved in the shape of two towers linked by a bridge (I: 538)
  • A game that may be unique to Frey children is lord of the crossing, where a child plays at being the lord. Holding a stick he guards the crossing over a pool of water (necessary to the game) and others challenge him. The only way to win is to slip "mayhaps" amidst the play oaths that the lord makes them swear and then to push him into the water. Only the lord carries a stick (II: 56-57)
  • Lord of the crossing usually comes down to shoving, hitting, and falling into the water, with many arguments over whether "mayhaps" has been said or not (II: 57)
  • House Erenford, sworn to House Frey. Their sigil is a heron (II: 739. IV: 569)
  • The villages of Hag's Mire and Sevenstreams are within the Frey lands, which seem to extend to the beginnings of the Blue Fork, and perhaps even beyond (III: 5, 6, 518)
  • At the Twins some say that eating frogs as the crannogmen do will cause teeth to turn green and moss to grow from armpits (III: 104)
  • The Freys can gather a force of some 1,000 horse and nearly 3,000 foot, and still leaving themselves with a strong garrison (III: 160)
  • Other houses of greater lineage look down on the Freys as upstarts (III: 162)
  • The Freys have sought to conquer Greywater in the Neck in the past, and have always failed. They do not like the crannogmen even still, however, and the crannogmen expect to be attacked by them (III: 278, 280)
  • House Charlton, sworn to house Frey. Their sigil is three springs of misteltoe (III: 385. IV: 569)
  • Counting Lord Hoster, Walder Frey has known four Lord Tullys (III: 559)
  • House Haigh, its emblem a pitchfork. They are sworn to House Frey (III: 564. IV: 569)
  • Merrett Frey, one of Lord Walder's sons by his third wife, served alongside Jaime Lannister as squire to Lord Sumner Crakehall. He was captured by Wenda the White Fawn and then ransomed, but shortly after took a blow to the head from one of the outlaws of the Kingswood Brotherhood that ended his fighting days (III: 916, 918, 920)
  • In the reign of Aerys I, the Freys married a daughter of the family to Lord Butterwell, who had been left without heirs after the Blackfyre Rebellion and the Great Spring Sickness. It's claimed that this marriage happened because Lord Frey's daughter had been caught abed with a scullion by her young brother, the heir Walder Frey, who screamed when he saw them in congress (TMK: 662, 679)
  • Ser Addam Frey, a cousin to Lord Butterwell's bride, was defeated at the wedding tourney by Ser Uthor Underleaf, a hedge knight called the Snail (TMK: 695)
  • Lord Frey abandoned the conspiracy to crown Daemon Blackfyre immediately when Prince Aegon, son of Prince Maekar, revealed himself to him and Lord Butterwell and claimed he and Ser Duncan were spies for his father (TMK: 722)
  • Lord Frey was permitted to depart Whitewalls by Lord Bloodraven, without any apparent loss to himself (TMK: 734)
5.2.3.2. The Whents of Harrenhal
  • House Wode, knights sworn to Harrenhal who hold two earth-and-timber keeps just north of the stream that separates the riverland from the lands owing fealty to King's Landing (I: 276. IV: 400)
  • Harrenhal was a seat of kings (I: 643)
  • Harren the Black and his line died in the burning of Harrenhal by Aegon the Conqueror (I: 684)
  • Harren had desired the highest hall and the most colossal towers in the Seven Kingdoms. The construction of his dream took forty years. Thousands of captives from the other realms died in the quarries chained to sledges or laboring on the five huge towers. Weirwoods were cut down to provide rafters and beams (II: 88)
  • Every house that has held Harrenhal since Harren the Black died has met misfortune and it is believed to be cursed (II: 88)
  • On the north edge of the God's Eye is Harrentown (II: 157)
  • Ghosts are said to dwell in Harrenhal (II: 157)
  • Harrenhal is one of the richest castles in the Seven Kingdoms. Its lands are broad and rich and fertile (II: 202)
  • Harrenhal is near the fords of the Trident which provide access to the lands south of it (II: 235)
  • Stories have it that Harren the Black mixed the blood of children into the mortar of Harrenhal (II: 307)
  • Just west of Harrenhal is a town, probably Harrentown (II: 308)
  • Harrenhal is built on a gigantic scale, its colossal curtain walls sheer and high as mountain cliffs while atop the battlements the wood-and-iron scorpions seem as small as their namesakes when seen from the ground (II: 308)
  • Harrenhal's gatehouse is as large as Winterfell's Great Keep, and its stone is discoloured and fissured (II: 308)
  • From outside the gatehouse, only the tops of five immense towers can be seen because of the height of the walls obscure the view of them (II: 308)
  • The shortest of Harrenhal's towers is half again as high as the tallest one in Winterfell, yet none of the towers are proper; they're bent and lumped and cracked from the melting of the stone by the Targaryen dragons centuries earlier (II: 308)
  • Harrenhal's bathhouse is large and made of stone and timber. It's on the edge of the Flowstone Yard (II: 308, 655)
  • The occupied towers of Harrenhal are so large that they each have an understeward (II: 309)
  • No one remembers the names that Harren the Black gave to his towers, but now they are called the Tower of Dread, the Widow's Tower, the Wailing Tower, the Tower of Ghosts, and Kingspyre Tower (II: 334)
  • There are cavernous vaults beneath the Wailing Tower (II: 334)
  • Harrenhal's kitchens are inside of a round stone building with a domed roof (II: 334)
  • Servants would eat at the trestle table in the undercrofts of the towers (II: 334)
  • There's a forge in Harrenhal (II: 334)
  • Much of Harrenhal is far gone in decay. The Whents used only the lower thirds of two of the five towers, letting the rest go to ruin (II: 334)
  • Men-at-arms eat in the Barracks Hall above the armory (II: 335)
  • The ground floor of the Wailing Tower is given over to storerooms and granaries. The two floors above would be used to house a garrison (II: 335)
  • The upper stories of the Wailing Tower have not been occupied for eighty years (II: 335)
  • The topmost stories of the towers are infested with nests of huge black bats (II: 335)
  • There are claims that Harren the Black and his sons haunt the cellars of the Wailing Tower, even though they died in the Kingspyre Tower (II: 335)
  • The Wailing Tower is named so because it wails when the wind blows from the north and the air runs through the cracks made by the heat of the burning (II: 335)
  • The Kingspyre Tower is still the tallest of the towers, but it's lopsided under the weight of the slagged stone that make it look like a candle (II: 335)
  • Harrenhal covers three times as much ground as Winterfell and its buildings are so much larger that they can scarcely be compared. Its stables house a thousand horses, its godswood covers 20 acres, its kitchens are as large as Winterfell's Great Hall (II: 336)
  • Harrenhal's great hall is named the Hall of a Hundred Hearths but it has only thirty-three or thirty-five hearths. They are huge, however, with about ten feet separating each (II: 336. III: 421)
  • An entire army of thousands could be feasted in the hall (II: 336)
  • Walls, doors, halls, and steps are all built to a giant scale (II: 336)
  • The Flowstone Yard with its lumpy surface is where men-at-arms and knights might exercise and where squires clean arms and armor (II: 338, 400)
  • There is a covered gallery above the Flowstone Yard with arches looking towards it (II: 339)
  • The east gates are portcullised (II: 339)
  • Harrenhal has a brewhouse (II: 403)
  • A stone bridge arches between the Widow's Tower and Kingspyre (II: 403)
  • There is a great cell under the Widow's Tower that's used to keep prisoners (II: 495)
  • When empty, Harrenhal seems strange. Sometimes the stones seem to soak up sound, while at other times echoes are amplified many times over (II: 496)
  • Crossing the middle bailey, one can go around the Tower of Dread to reach the mews where falcons were once raised (and are now said to exist there only as ghosts) (II: 496)
  • The castellan's chambers in Kingspyre are as spacious as that of a lord's (II: 496)
  • There are cellars beneath Kingspyre (II: 496)
  • Harrenhal's forge is in the armory (II: 496)
  • The Lothstons ruled Harrenhal before the Whents, and within living memory. The last of them was killed several generation's ago. They had a black reputation (II: 497. IV: 60)
  • Harrenhal's godswood has a small stream running through it (II: 498)
  • Harrenhal has a weirwood heart tree, its face carved into a terrible visage full of hatred with a twisted mouth and flaring eyes (II: 499)
  • An arched span of bridge divides the outer and the middle wards (II: 501)
  • The Barracks Hall and the armory are across the ward from where the godswood is (II: 501)
  • Just inside the door into the Widow's Tower is a winding stair leading down to the dungeons. The steps reach a dank stone vault which is long, gloomy, and windowless. Scones on the walls hold torches (II: 503)
  • The vault is separated from the cell by heavy iron bars (II: 503)
  • Harrenhal's middle ward has a bear pit (II: 507)
  • There is a well in the Flowstone Yard (II: 648)
  • There is a privy shaft in the lord's chambers (II: 655)
  • The great solar for the lord of Harrenhal is down half a flight of stairs from the bedchamber. It is a spare, draughty room which is as large as the halls of many smaller castles (II: 654)
  • There is a huge oaken table in the lord's solar (II: 654)
  • To get to the godswood from Kingspyre, a person must pass the Wailing Tower (II: 657)
  • Kingspyre's cellar has narrow windows (II: 658)
  • There's a loft in the forge where apprentices sleep (II: 658)
  • There's a postern in the east wall behind the Tower of Ghosts (II: 658)
  • The godswood is walled (II: 659)
  • The Tower of Ghosts is the most ruinous of the Harrenhal's towers. It stands behind the remains of a sept that collapsed when the Targaryens burned the castle with their dragons (II: 660)
  • Weeds grow between the broke stones about the Tower of Ghosts (II: 660)
  • The postern near the Tower of Ghosts is one of the least of Harrenhal's gates, being a narrow door of strong oak studded with iron nails set in an angle of the wall beneath a defensive tower (II: 660)
  • There are woods and streams not far north of Harrenhal (III: 35)
  • The land north of Harrenhal grows progressively hillier (III: 39)
  • There are several rivers between Harrenhal and the Trident: the Darry, the Greenapple, the Maiden, the Little Willow, and perhaps others (III: 39)
  • The Little Willow flows into the Big Willow, which in turn flows into the Trident (III: 40)
  • Many great lords came from all over Westeros to witness or take part in Lord Whent's tourney. Mace Tyrell was among them, and so were northerners from the barrowlands, Hornwoods, Mormonts, and Manderlys (III: 280, 281)
  • Ser Oswell Whent of the Kingsguard was Lord Whent's brother. He and his four nephews swore to defend Lord Whent's daughter as queen of love and beauty (III: 280. SSM: 1)
  • The walls of Harrenhal are so thick that passing beneath them feels like passing through a stone tunnel (III: 347)
  • There are broad stone steps leading from the outer ward to the entrance of one of the collosal round towers (III: 347)
  • Harrenhal's bathhouse is a low-ceilinged room filled with great stone tubs large enough to hold six or seven after the fashion of the Free Cities (III: 416)
  • The Hall of a Hundred Hearths is huge, larger even than the throne room of the Red Keep. There are steps to two galleries above (III: 421)
  • The floor of the great hall is of smooth slate (III: 421)
  • It had been long years since King Aerys had last left the Red Keep when he went to Harrenhal for Lord Whent's tourney (III: 485)
  • Harrenhal's eastern gate is smaller than its main gate (III: 501)
  • Six miles east of Harrenhal stands the lake road which runs southwards (III: 501)
  • Harren the Black had wished to do even his bear-baiting in lavish style, so the bear pit at Harrenhal is ten yards across and five yards deep, walled in stone, floored with sand, and encircled by six tiers of marble benches (III: 510)
  • The boundary between the lands sworn to King's Landing and those sworn to Riverrun, marked by a stream, is a mere day's ride north of Sow's Horn, which in turn is perhaps a week's ride north of King's Landing (IV: 400)
  • Through the main gates, the walls are so thick that no less than a dozen murder holes are passed before one reaches the yard on the other side (IV: 401)
  • Hunter's Hall (IV: 405)
  • Lady Shella Whent was wife to Lord Whent, who hosted the great tourney at Harrenhal. The fair maid was her daughter (SSM: 1)
  • Harrenhal is immensely strong, and a garrison of three hundred men should be able to hold it against a siege for half a year or more (SSM: 1)
  • Harrenhal is so large that a larger-than-normal garrison is needed to hold it against a determined siege (SSM: 1
5.2.3.3. The Brackens of the Stone Hedge
  • The Brackens and the Blackwoods have been feuding for thousands of years, from the time of the Age of Heroes when they were rivals as kings over the riverlands at various points in time. Matters were not helped when the Brackens abandoned the old gods in favor of the Seven (I: 662. THK: 43. SSM: 1)
  • The feud between the Brackens and the Blackwoods was reinvigorated when Ser Otho Bracken, called the Brute of Bracken, killed Lord Quentyn Blackwood in tourney at King's Landing in about the year 205 (THK: 463)
  • The Bracken lands touch the Red Fork (III: 22)
  • In 211, Lord Bracken was dying a slow death, while his eldest son died of the plague during the Great Spring Sickness. This left Ser Otho, the Brute of Bracken, as heir, a situation which could mean war as the Blackwoods hated him (TSS: 121)
  • Lord Bracken was delayed by storms on the narrow sea, which kept him from arriving with Myrish crossbowmen to support Daemon Blackfyre (TSS: 135-136)
  • Lord Otho Bracken, the Brute of Bracken, was not among those who attended Lord Butterwell's tourney in the reign of King Aerys I (TMK: 672)
  • Bittersteel was Ser Aegor Rivers, the bastard son of Aegon the Unworthy by his fifth mistress, Lady Barba Bracken. Angry at his lot as a bastard, he was dark-haired, lithe, and hard. He wore a horsehead crest upon his helm and his arms featured a red stallion with black dragon wings, snorting flame against a golden field (SSM: 1, 2)
5.2.3.4. The Blackwoods of Raventree Hall
  • The Blackwoods follow the old gods, and are one of the few southron houses to continue to do so (I: 661. SSM: 1)
  • The Brackens and the Blackwoods have been feuding for thousands of years, from the time of the Age of Heroes when they were rivals as kings over the riverlands at various points in time. Matters were not helped when the Brackens abandoned the old gods in favor of the Seven (I: 662. THK: 43. SSM: 1)
  • The feud between the Brackens and the Blackwoods was reinvigorated when Ser Otho Bracken, called the Brute of Bracken, killed Lord Quentyn Blackwood in tourney at King's Landing in about the year 205 (THK: 463)
  • Lord Bloodraven was an albino, marked with a blotch of discolored skin on his chin and across one cheek which some claimed to resemble a raven. His personal guard were called the Raven's Teeth, and he carried the Valyrian steel sword Dark Sister on his hip. He lacked an eye, which he lost to Bittersteel on the Redgrass Field. He was the bastard son of Aegon the Unworthy by his sixth mistress, Lady Mylessa Blackwood, who was known as Missy. His personal arms were a white dragon with red eyes (TSS: 81. SSM: 1)
  • Blackwoods have had wives from House Osgrey in the past (TSS: 112)
  • In 211, Lord Bracken was on his deathbed while his son Ser Otho, the Brute of Bracken, stood as his heir. This was a situation that was considered intolerable for the Blackwoods and could lead to war (TSS: 121)
  • An army appeared outside Whitewalls, a host raised at Lord Bloodraven's command. Lord Blackwood was among its leaders (TMK: 731)
5.2.3.5. The Mallisters of Seagard
  • Jason Mallister cut down three of Rhaegar Targaryens bannermen at the Trident (I: 247)
  • Seagard was built to defend the coast from ironborn reavers (II: 131)
  • The Booming Tower is named so because of its immense bronze bell, used to call the townsfolk and others into the safety of the castle when longships were sighted (II: 131)
  • The bell of the Booming Tower was rung only once in three hundred years, when Rodrik Greyjoy ventured to raid Seagard during his father's rebellion. Jason Mallister slew him beneath the walls and threw the ironmen back into the bay (II: 131)
  • When Prince Rhaegar was young, he rode brilliantly in a tourney at Storm's End, defeating many notables, including Lord Jason Mallister (III: 485)
  • The Mallisters have some half dozen longships and two war galleys to protect their shores from raiders (III: 525)
  • The Cape of Eagles is near Seagard (III: 525)
  • Ser Denys Mallister once unhorsed Lord Tarly (father to Lord Randyll Tarly) and Lord Alester Florent in a tournament. He was a squire at 12, a knight at 18, and a tourney champion at 22, and he has since gone on to command the Shadow Tower for some 33 years (III: 888, 889)
5.2.3.6. The Darrys of Darry
  • The Darry lands and castle are modest, half a day’s ride south of the Trident (I: 128)
  • The Darrys fought for the Targaryens in the War of the Usurper (I: 128, 241)
  • There is a song of Lord Deremond (who may have been a Darry) at the Bloody Meadow (II: 476)
  • There is a river named Darry between Harrenhall and the Trident (III: 39)
  • Ser Willem Darry was the master-at-arms of the Red Keep at least from the time that Prince Rhaegar was a boy (III: 91)
  • The Darrys once stood high in King Aerys’s favor, and had been prominent Targaryen loyalists. This cost them half their lands, most of their wealth, and almost all of their power (III: 918)
  • House Darry has ruled its lands since the Andals cast down the First Men in the lands watered by the Trident (IV: 445)
  • The keep of the Darry castle is called the Plowman's Keep (IV: 447)
  • Darry is a small castle as such things go, but the hunting is good along the river (IV: 447)
  • The Darrys were very loyal to the Targaryen kings, and kept tapestries of all the Targaryen kings from Aegon the Conqueror to Aerys the Second (IV: 448)
  • The Darry castle is large enough to hold at least a hundred men in its yards (IV: 455)
  • The sept of the Darry castle is off the inner ward. It is seven-sided but windowless, half-timbered with carved wooden doors and a tiled roof. The Seven loom above carved altars (IV: 455, 456)
  • The castle has a godswood (IV: 459)
  • At the time of Daemon Blackfyre's rebellion, Lord Darry was fiercely loyal to King Daeron the good (IV: 548)
  • The Darrys at one time controlled lands that included the old inn near the crossing of the Trident (IV: 548)
  • Lord Norbert Vance of Atranta and Ser Brynden Tully of Riverrun together served as squires to Lord Darry (IV: 567)
  • Ser Jonothor Darry, brother to Ser Willem Darry, was the second member of the Kingsguard to die at the Trident (SSM: 1)