The Citadel: SSM

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I have loved reading (and re-reading) the books you have written so far in the "A Song of Ice and Fire" series, and that I am greatly looking forward to the forthcoming books. I've been told that you sometimes answer reader's queries relating to the books over email, and was wondering if you could answer some of mine if you're not too busy? I realise you may not be able to answer some of these questions without compromising what plot twists you may have planned, but for what it's worth:

1. Was Mirri Maz Duur telling the truth when she told Daenerys Targaryen that the latter could never have children again?

I am sure Dany would like to know. Prophecy can be a tricky business.

2. Is Varys truly a eunuch, or is it just another of his many disguises?

Guess we won't know till someone takes a peek inside his breeches.

3. Is Daenerys Targaryen or anyone in her entourage able to tell whether her dragons are male or female? (Is the question relevant to dragons?)

Not yet.

4. Daenerys Targaryen believed that her brother Rhaegar loved Lyanna Stark. Does she also believe that Lyanna Stark returned this love?

Dany is not sure what to believe.

5. Since all of their mothers died, who gave Jon Snow, Daenerys Targaryen and Tyrion Lannister their names?

Mothers can name a child before birth, or during, or after, even while they are dying. Dany was most like named by her mother, Tyrion by his father, Jon by Ned.

6. I can understand why Robert Baratheon was sent to be John Arryn's ward -- his parents had died -- but why was Eddard Stark sent as well? Was this an established practice among noble houses? Were Stannis and/or Renly Baratheon sent to be wards with anyone?

Yes, fostering was common among noble houses, both in Westeros and in the real middle ages. Especially for boys. It was considered both a means of education, and a way to cultivate friendships and alliances.

Thank you once more for your time and all the best for your future works.

You're welcome.

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