Westeros

The 'A Song of Ice and Fire' Domain

GoT

EP406: The Laws of Gods and Men

Written by Bryan Cogman
Directed by Alik Sakharov
IMDB

Stannis and Davos set sail with a new strategy. Dany meets with supplicants. Tyrion faces down his father in the throne room.

Index

Recap

Seen from above, a galley enters the screen below, prow parting the waters as it sails along to its destination. Aboard are King Stannis and Ser Davos, both of them serious as they approach Braavos. As our view pulls back, we see the towering Titan of Braavos between whose legs the galley sails, and beyond the sprawling city in its sheltered lagoon. The scene shifts then to the inside of the Iron Bank of Braavos, where Stannis paces back and forth impatiently. He complains of having to wait since midday.

Davos replies that Easterners have a different sense of time, he’s found, and begins to launch into an anecdote of a smuggling run he and Salladhor Saan carried out. With a luck, Stannis silences him, still pacing. Suddenly the doors open and three bankers of the Iron Bank appear and sit at the table. The chief of them, Tycho Nestoris, welcomes Stannis and Davos. He invites Stannis to sit on the stone benches opposite his high seat. Stannis hesitates, clearly unhappy with sitting on a bench at a lower height than the enthroned bankers, but he does so.

Tycho asks what the bank can do for “Lord Stannis”, and Davos corrects him, giving Stannis his full style. Tycho responds that the Iron Throne is occupied by Tommen Baratheon, not Stannis. Stannis denies that Tommen is his kin, and Tycho claims he’s heard the tale from Tommen’s grandfather: a jealous uncle, an usurper, costing the Seven Kingdoms in blood and gold. Stannis notes that was gold that the Iron Bank loaned to Tywin. Tycho questions whether Stannis’s blood gives him a claim to the Iron Bank’s gold, and Stannis says it does: “More than any man living.”

The banker replies that the books of Westeros are filled with terms like “usurper”, “madman”, and “blood right.” The bank has books filled with numbers, whose stories they prefer as they are plainer and “less open to interpretation”. Tycho then asks what support Stannis has. Stannis names 4,000 soldiers, and Davos starts to number the ships when Tycho interjects and tells him to count those that are still afloat. Davos revises the number he was going to give to 32. Tycho then asks about the amount of food produced on Dragonstone to feed so many men, and Stannis admits none of it is.

At that Tycho explains that those numbers seem unlikely to give Stannis any hope, and so the bank declines Stannis’s request for support. Stannis stares at Davos, and then gets up and starts to depart. Davos addresses Tycho, saying, “My lord.” Tycho corrects him, noting he is not a lord… and in Braavos, Davos would not be one either as “thieves are not rewarded with titles” there. Davos confronts Tycho as Stannis looks away towards the exit. Davos notes he didn’t steal anything, as that’s what the pirates did; he just moved their goods. Then, removing the glove from his hand, he shows the missing fingers to Tycho and notes that that was the payment Stannis demanded for his crimes. as he puts his glove back on, he considers that an honest accounting, and Stannis is an honest man who is the bank’s best chance to get their loans to Westeros repaid since it must have cost a lot to help fund the Lannister wars.

Tycho claims the war is over, and Davos refutes him, noting the war continues while Stannis lives. Then Davos asks who’s the true power in King’s Landing, and Tycho responds Tywin, and at Davos’s prompting adds that Tywin is 67 years old. Davos seizes the chance and suggests that when Tywin dies, a half-grown boy born of incest might command, or Cersei who is despised by her own people, or Jaime Lannister who killed a king he’d sworn to protect. He asks again who the bank will look to when Tywin’s gone. Tycho suggests that’s a problem for the future, and Davos disagrees.

Pointing at Stannis, he notes that his king is the only reliable man left: he has the birthright, he’s in his prime, he’s an experienced battle commander. And then, holding up his hand again, he notes that Stannis also pays people back rather than just talking about it.

We shift to a bath house in Braavos, where naked prostitutes entertain bathers, male and female alike. A naked woman slips into the bath, joining a man, while at another pool the familiar figure of Salladhor Saan regales two prostitutes with a ribald jest, involving a captain calling for a red shirt whenever danger threatens, and always leading his men to victory. Davos enters the room, carrying a small case, and spotting his old friend makes his way to him without announcing himself. Standing behind him, he hears Salladhor tell of the captain looking out to see ten pirate ships surrounding his ship, and then shouting—

“Bring me my brown pants!” the two prostitutes call out, to Saan’s annoyance as they giggle. Davos then speaks, asking if Salladhor really thought they’d never met a pirate who didn’t share that shirt. Salladhor looks to him, surprised, and notes he’d heard Davos was rotting in a dungeon in Dragonstone. Davos replies he was only half-rotted. Salladhor Saan laughs, and offers his hand to Davos. He invites Davos to join him and the two prositutes naming one Lhara, and then the other speaks and note that she is the one named Lhara. Davos declines the invitation, noting that they’re to sail at sunset.

That puts Salladhor off, and he questions Davos. Davos repeats that he and Salladhor are going, and Salladhor scoffs and tells the women that once he thought Davos loved him, but now he knows that he despises him as he wants to see him die poor and alone. Davos throws the case down before Saan, who stops. The two exchange a look, and then he opens it to see stacks of coins bearing the mark of the Iron Bank. Davos notes that Saan will be neither alone nor poor, and then indicates that he left a chest of “the good stuff” at his home… but that he gave it to Saan’s wife. The women giggle, as Saan gives Davos a look and then says to him, “You are not my friend, my friend.”

At sea, Asha Greyjoy has the ironmen gathered as her ship sails on. She reads to them the letter Ramsay Snow sent to Pyke. As she speaks, we see into the Dreadfort, where Myranda loudly makes violent love to Ramsay, and then the ironborn rowing boats with Asha at the lead. Yara tells them of the horrors Ramsay committed on their countrymen and their prince, and that what’s been done to Theon has been done to them as well. She tells them that the word ironborn means nothing so long as Ramsay can hurt “our prince.” We see inside the Dreadfort again, Myranda screaming and moaning her pleasure as a grappling hook is thrown onto the walls.

A guard, hearing the noise, approaches to investigate and receives an axe in his head for his trouble. Asha climbs up and takes the axe. The ironborn spread out, overtaking guards. One guard Yara holds at knifepoint and asks for Theon Greyjoy. He tries to deny knowledge of it, but Asha insists he take her to the dungeons. He replies that he’s not in the dungeons… and we soon see that he’s kept in a cage in the kennels, among the castle’s hounds. Theon awakens when he hears fighting outside, where Asha has her hostage. The man directs her to the last cage, and she thanks him before slitting his throat with the blade of her axe.

She enters the kennel, as the hounds bark, and finds Theon cowering away from her. She identifies herself, and Theon insists she can’t trick him, insisting that he’s Reek and not Theon. Asha turns, calling on the ironman with her to help her. Theon struggles against them, denying who he is, screaming that he’s always been good, loyal Reek. As they struggle with him, Ramsay appears bare-chested, covered in blood, a knife and an axe in hand and with half a dozen Bolton soldiers beind him. The ironborn with Asha raise their childs, waiting. Ramsay smiles and says it’s turning into a lovely evening before charging into the fray, his men with him.

The fighting is brutal in the cramped space, and Asha can’t help as Theon struggles violently. Suddenly he bites her hand, and she’s forced to let go. He flees into his kennel, hiding in it. Asha plunges into the fight, slaying men, and managing with the surviving ironborn to force their way to the exit. The fighting pauses for a moment, and Asha demands Theon with the promise that no more men will need to die. Ramsay smirks and says she has “bigger balls” than her brother ever did. Sheathing his dagger, he wonders how fast she can run as he displays a key. And then he turns to the lock of one of the kennels. There’s a long moment as Asha stares.

We then see her and the survivors running to the boats. She commands them to make for the ship, and one questions her, asking about Theon. “My brother is dead,” she replies.

That night in the Dreadfort, Ramsay gives Theon a treat for his proof of devotion, showing Theon to a bath that he calls a reward. Theon insists that he didn’t want to be taken, that he was so frightened that they would. Ramsay moves up to Theon and tells him to remove his ragged clothing. He does so, pausing after removing his tunic (revealing a mass of scars all over his torso) but Ramsay insists everything else must go. Theon hesitates at that, btu does as he’s told. Ramsay look on his naked body and grins wickedly. Then pointing him to the tub, he watches as Theon stumbles into it, whimpering and then seeming amazed at the luxury of it.

Ramsay sits on the tub’s edge, and starts to scrub Theon’s back with a cloth. Ramsay asks if Theon loves him, and Theon says he does. Then Ramsay explains he needs Theon to do something for him: taking a castle that some “bad men” hold and which he wants to take back. Theon, confused, asks how. Ramsay explains he’ll play a role, to pretend he’s someone who he isn’t. Theon asks who, and Ramsay replies, “Theon Greyjoy.”

In far away Meereen, a goatherd and his son are out herding their goats. The boy, sitting, throws rocks to pass the time. Water splashes with each stone he throws, but then there’s a strange sound as a rock thuds. He stares in confusion… and then fear, as Daenerys’s black dragon flies up into view, screeching and hovering above him. The boy scrambles back, trying tor run. The dragon passes him by and unleashes his fire, roasting a goat alive before he grabs hold of the bleating, burning animal in his claws and flies away.

In Meereen proper, the goatherd awaits any audience with Daenerys. Missandei provides a lengthy style for Daenerys in the Valyrian of Meereen. Daenerys urges the goatherd to come forward with the bundle he carries. The man explains that he prayed for Daenerys’s victories over the slavers, for which Daenerys thanks him. He then lowers the bundle, and unwraps it to reveal the burnt remains of a goat. Missandei explains that the dragons were at fault, that they came for his flock and left him with nothing. Daenerys offers the man her condolences, and offers to pay three times the value of the goats to make it up to him. He bows and departs.

Then Daenerys calls for the next supplicant. The Meereenese nobleman Hizdahr zo Loraq is announced by a servant, but Daenerys informs him in a harsh tone that Hizdahr can address her himself. The nobleman moves forward and bows. He compliments her beauty, which makes her smile and she thanks him. He then explains that his family is one of the oldest and most prestigious in Meereen, that his father was beloved and did much to restore and maintain the greatest landmarks of the cities. This includes the pyramid Daenerys has commandeered. Daenerys smiles and says he has her gratitude, and that she would be honored to meet him.

Hizdahr replies, gravely, that she has: she crucified him. Her smile dies as he continues by saying that he hopes she’ll never live to see a kinsman treated so cruelly. Daenerys argues that his father crucified innocent children, and Hizdahr retorts that his father spoke against the act, calling it criminal, but that the other Masters overruled him. He then asks if it’s justice to answer one crime with another. Daenerys replies that she is sorry for the loss of his father… but then sternly adds that he would be wise to remember that what she did to the Masters was no crime.

Hizdahr replies that what is done is done. Raising his hands as if in supplication, he informs her that he is a servant of Meereen, one who wishes to see the traditions of his people maintained. Daenerys asks what traditions he wishes to keep. He explains that he wishes to adhere to the funeral customs of Meereen, including a proper burial in the Temple of the Graces. Daenerys seems surprised by the request. He notes that his father and 162 Meereenese are nailed to posts, carrion for vultures and rotting in the sun. Falling to his knees, he begs her to order the men take down and buried properly.

Daenerys angrily notes that the slave children were also left to rot in the sun, and if Hizdahr means to ask for their proper burial, as well. Hizdahr responds that he cannot defend what the masters did, but he can only speak as a son who loved his father and again begs that he be allowed to take down his father’s body and see him buried with dignity so that he “might find peace in the next world.” Daenerys considers Hizdahr, seemingly moved by his emotional plea. She then gives him leave to bury his father. He bows his head and thanks the queen. He rises and backs away before turning and departing.

Daenerys seems exhausted, wrung out emotionally, after that. She asks how many more supplicants, and Missandei replies that there are 212 remaining. Daenerys echoes the number, disbelieving, and then looks to Jorah. After a silente exchange, she tells Missandei to call in the next supplicant.

In King’s Landing, the small council meets with its latest additions among their number, Lord Mace Tyrell and Prince Oberyn Martell. Prince Oberyn, sitting very casually while Cersei remains standing and paces, hopes the meetings will not be so early all the time as he had been up late the previous night. There’s no response. He continues, asking if he’s now “master of something”, and wonders if it’s coins or ships.

Lord Tyrell, sitting on the other side of the table, interjects that Lord Tywin and he had decided that he would be Master of Ships a good while before. He’s interrupted when Lord Tywin enters, and he and the other small council members stand… except Oberyn, who remain seated, and Cersei, who never sat in the first place. Lord Tyrell begins to thank Tywin for the honor for having a seat on the council, but Tywin interrupts him as he sits down at the head of the table, noting that the trial begins in the afternoon, so they will only have that morning for important business.

Varys then informs the council of various items of news, such as the fact that Sandor Clegane has been seen in the riverlands, killing five Lannister soldiers and saying, “Fuck the king.” Cersei calls him a coward and traitor, and Pycelle regards his words as disgraceful. Tywin asks what it would cost to make a soldier stupid enough to try and kill or capture the Hound. Varys suggests ten stags, and Tywin raises it to a hundred.

Varys then adds there are more whispers from the east. Tywin asks if they have to do with the “Targaryen girl.” Varys states that Daenerys has conquered Meereen and rules it as a queen. Cersei questions how she conquered the city, and Varys replies that she has an army of 8,000 Unsullied, the Second Sons, two knights advising her in Barristan Selmy and Jorah Mormont… and three dragons. “Baby dragons,” Cersei responds, but Varys notes they grow bigger every year.

As Oberyn watches silently, Pycelle looks to Varys and says Mormont spies on Daenerys for them, but Varys notes that’s no longer the case—he seems fully devoted to her now. He adds that Barristan seems to have taken his dismissal from the Kingsguard “a bit harder than anticipated.” Cersei dismisses him as an old man, not fit to protect Joffrey. Tywin acerbically notes that he didn’t die on his watch. He calls the dismissal an insult, as well as stupid. Cersei dismisses Daenerys as a child far away across half the world, but Varys replies she has two seasoned warriors counseling her and an army at her back.

Oberyn chooses to speak up, noting that he has been to Essos and seen the Unsullied at first hand. “They are very impressive on the battlefield,” he notes, and then looking to Cersei adds, “Less so in the bedroom.” Tywin retorts that dragons have won no wars in 300 years, and that armies win them all the time. Then, he decides Daenerys must be dealt with. Pycelle questions how, and whether they’re to use force. Tywin says it may eventually come to it. But then asking Varys if his “little birds” can get into Meereen, Varys says they certainly can.

“Lord Tyrell, be a good man. Fetch my quill and paper,” Tywin says. Tyrell, treated as a servant, rises and gives as dignified and superior a look as he can to Oberyn before doing as he’s told.

Later, in the throne room, we see Varys looking at the empty Iron Throne. Beside him is the stand where the accused will be placed during the trial. Oberyn approaches and leans on the stands. They greet one another. “Lord Varys,” Oberyn starts, leaving it hanging as if looking for Varys to provide a last name. “Only Varys,” the eunuch replies. “I’m not actually a nobleman.” Varys remarks that Oberyn seems very knowledgeable about the Unsullied, and asks if he spent much time in Essos.

Oberyn replies he was there for five years, and when Varys asks why, Oberyn says it’s a big and beautiful world, and that most simply live and die in a little corner of the world. “Most of us aren’t princes,” Varys replies. Oberyn looks at him, and then chuckles. He asks if Varys if from Lys. Varys seems surprised, and Oberyn says he has a gift for accents. Varys stonily responds he’s lost his accent, and Oberyn dismissively responds that he has a gift for that, too.

When Oberyn asks how he came to Westeros, Varys says it’s been a long story, and Oberyn assumes it’s one that he doesn’t like telling people. Varys suggests he’d share with people he trusts. Oberyn approaches Varys then and suggests that his paramour Ellaria would find him very interesting, and that she should come to the brothel and meet her. “We brought our on wine, not the swill they serve her,” he adds as an inducement, and notes as well that there are lovely boys on retainer… He stops, noticing Varys’s impression. Oberyn is surprised, assuming Varys liked boys before he was cut.

Varys silently shakes his head. Oberyn then supposes he was interested in girls, and asks him to forgive him when he says he never would have guessed. Varys takes no offense… but he notes he wasn’t interested in girls, either. He wasn’t interested in anything, really. Oberyn doubts it, but Varys says he’s very glad to have no part in desire, after having seen what it does to the kingdom. And in any case, he adds, the absence of desire allows him to pursue other things. Oberyn asks what those might be. Varys doesn’t answer at first… then directs his gaze to the Iron Throne. Oberyn looks to it, and then Varys as Varys walks away.

Outside Tyrion’s cell, Jaime has the door opened. Tyrion, seated on a bench, stands and guesses he’s been pardoned. Jaime says nothing, clearly troubled by having to do this task. He nods to the watchmen with him and they come around to put Tyrion in fetters. The Imp asks, “Really?” Jaime replies that it’s their father’s orders, and Tyrion says it wouldn’t do to disappoint him.

Marched down the length of the throne room, between two rows of stands packed with courtiers, Tyrion is placed in the accused’s box. His chains are attached to it. King Tommen, seated on the Iron Throne, stands. The rest of the court stands as well. He recuses himself from the trial, and leaves his grandfather to judge in his name, as well as Prince Oberyn and Lord Mace. He adds that if Tyrion is found guilty, may the gods punish the accused. Tyrion, having heard that last with eyes closed, opens them again and nods slightly Tommen before the king leaves escorted by two Kingsguard.

The judges take their seats, with Tywin on the Iron Throne itself. Tywin questions Tyrion if he or Sansa killed Joffrey. Tyrion denies it. When Tywin asks how Tyrion would characterize his death, Tyrion suggests that Joffrey choked on his pigeon pie. Jaime shoots his brother a distressed look, and Tywin asks if Tyrion means to blame the bakers. “Or the pigeons. Just leave me out of it,” Tyrion responds. Tyrion looks at the crowd murmurs at Tyrion’s levity.

Then Tywin announces his first witness. We see Tyrion slouched in his back as Ser Meryn Trant of the Kingsguard recounts the riot in King’s Landing, where Tyrion slapped Joffrey and insulted him. Meryn notes it was not the first threat he delivered to Joffrey, recounting when Tyrion marched up to the throne and called his nephew a halfwit and suggested that he could meet the same fate as Aerys, the Mad King. Trant notes that Tyrion threatened to have him killed as well, when he spoke in Joffrey’s defense. Tyrion, unable to take it anymore, sarcastically asks why he doesn’t tell them what Joffrey was doing at the time.

Tywin demands silence, but Tyrion presses on about Joffrey aiming his crossbow at Sansa Stark after Trant tore her clothing and beat her. Tywin shouts for silence again, and commands Tyrion to not speak unless called upon. Tywin then dismisses Trant, who gives Tyrion a dirty look as he passes him by. We then find Grand Maester Pycelle reading out a lengthy list of poisons in his possession. Oberyn interrupts him, suggesting they understand that he has many poisons. “Had,” Pycelle replies. He claims Tyrion looted his stores, glaring at Tyrion as he speaks, and Tyrion looks put out.

Tywin then asks if Pycelle will confirm that Joffrey was without a doubt poisoned. Pycelle says yes, and then reveals the necklace Sansa had. He states it was found on the body of Dontos Hollard, who was last seen spiriting away Sansa. He notes the necklace, worn on the day of the wedding, has a residue of a very rare and terrible poison called the Strangler. When Tywin asks if it was among his stores, Pycelle says it was, and declares that it was a poison few possess that was used to “strike down the most noble child the gods ever put on this good earth.” He glares at Tyrion as he says it, and Tyrion looks to the floor as the crowd murmurs.

Then it’s Cersei’s turn to testify against Tyrion, quoting his promise to hurt her and turn all her joy to ashes to pay a debt. Mace Tyrell seems dumbfounded, asks her to confirm that Tyrion said it. Cersei nods, and indicates that it was before the battle of Blackwater Bay when she confronted him about his plans to put Joffrey on the front lines. She claims—falsely—that Joffrey insisted on remaining on the battlements. Tyrion holds his head in his hand as she speaks.

Oberyn asks her to explain what the “debt” was, and Cersei replies that she had found out he had been keeping whores in the Tower of the Hand. Demurely, she claims she asked him to confine his “salacious acts” to brothels, and he was angry at her for it.  Mace Tyrell ponderously thanks Cersei for the courage of her testimony. Then we see Varys is the next witness, and Lord Tyrell asks him about the precise threat Tyrion spoke to Joffrey on one occasion. Varys does so, quoting it word for word.

Mace asks him to confirm that Tyrion dared to say such a thing in the small council, and Varys does so, adding that Tyrion did not seem pleased with the news of Robb Stark’s death. He speculates aloud that his marriage to Sansa may have made him sympathetic to the northern cause. The crowd murmurs at that, shocked by the notion. Tywin dismisses Varys, but when Tyrion asks permission to put one question to Varys, Tywin allows it. Tyrion states that Varys once told him that without him, the city would have fallen, but that the histories would not credit him… but also that Varys himself would not forget. “Have you forgotten, Lord Varys?” he asks.

“Sadly, my lord,” Varys replies, “I never forget a thing.” He leaves then, after a bow. Tywin adjourns the trial for now, calling it to resume in an hour’s time. Guards clear the room as everyone rises. Cersei and Jaime exchange a glance. All leave, except Tyrion, who remains in his chains.

In Tywin’s chambers, Jaime approaches his father and asks if he really means to condemn his own son to death. Tywin points out that the trial is not over, and that he has condemned no one. Jaime calls it a farce rather than a trial, that Cersei has manipulated everything and he knows it. “I know nothing of the sort,” Tywin says in response to that accusation.  Jaime insists Tywin has always hated Tyrion, but Tywin insists in turn that Tyrion killed Joffrey.

“As did I,” Jaime notes. Then he points out to his father what Aerys’s last command was: to bring him Tywin’s head. He cannot believe that he saved his father’s life just to watch that father murder his own brother. Tywin is unmoved: it’s justice, not murder. Jaime is incredulous at the idea. Tywin goes on, stating he’s only doing his sworn duty as Hand, and that if Tyrion is found guilty, he will be punished accordingly. At that, Jaime notes that he’ll be executed. Tywin raises his voice, insisting that he’ll be punished appropriately.

Jaime changes tack, reminding his father that family is all that lives on, and that he dreamed of a dynasty that would last a thousand years. But what happens to that dynasty, he asks, when Tyrion dies? Jaime is a Kingsguard, and will not carry on the family line. Tywin curtly says he remembers Jaime’s oath. Jaime presses on, asking who’ll carry the lion banner into future banners? His nephews, like Lancel and others whose names he doesn’t remember?

Tywin retorts with his own question, asking what happens to the dynasty if he spares his grandson’s killer. Jaime has his answer: it will survive through him; he’ll leave the Kingsguard and assume his place as heir, if Tywin allows Tyrion to live.  “Done,” Tywin says with such alacrity that Jaime is visibly dumbfounded.

Tywin explains that if Tyrion pleads for mercy once the guilty verdict is rendered, he will be permitted to pleased for mercy at which time he’ll be allowed to take the black and join the Night’s Watch. Then, when that happens, Tywin expects Jaime to return to Casterly Rock after removing his white cloak, to marry a suitable woman and “father children named Lannister.” He adds that Jaime will also never turn his back on his family again. Jaime hesitates a long moment, and then swears to do it. Tywin gives his word as well. Father and son stare at one another. Then the bell sounds, and Jaime departs. Tywin sits back and finishes his glass of wine.

Marching into the throne room as the stands begin to fill, Jaime goes to Tyrion. Tyrion morbidly quips that it’s not going very well, but Jaime informs him of his arrangement with Tywin that will allow Tyrion to live. Tyrion notes Ned Stark was promised the same thing, but Jaime insists Tywin is not Joffrey and will keep his word. Tyrion asks how he knows, as they both look on the judges mounting the dais.  The crowd stands then, and Jaime tells Tyrion to trust him, to keep his mouth shut, and this will all be over soon.

Then the next witness is called, as Cersei looks at Tyrion. It’s Shae. Tyrion is stunned to see her approaching, while Jaime looks confused and uncertain. Shae mounts the witnesses stand under the eyes of the judges. After identifying herself, she swears to speak truthfully. When Tywin asks if she knows Tyrion, the two look at one another and then she turns back to say that she does. Indicating she is handmaiden to his wife Sansa, she states that she knows Tyrion is guilty. Tyrion sits back, thunderstruck, as the crowd reacts with surprise as she presses on and states that he planned the murder with Sansa.

Tywin calls for silence, and Shae presses on saying that Sansa wanted revenge for her family, whose deaths she blamed on Joffrey. As she speaks, we see that Cersei is staring at Tyrion. Shae adds that Tyrion was pleased to help, because he hated Joffrey, the queen, and Tywin as well. She confirms his theft of Pycelle’s poisons to place in the king’s wine—we see Margaery seems disturbed by this testimony. Oberyn questions how Shae could know all this… and she replies that she was not just a handmaid, she was Tyrion’s whore. The crowd murmurs again, shocked.

Mace Tyrell can hardly believe it, and asks her to repeat herself. After she states again that she was Tyrion’s whore, Tywin asks how he came into Tyrion’s service. She replies that he stole her from a knight in Tywin’s host, using his cutthroats to take her away after breaking the knight’s arm. She quotes him, stating that he said he owned her and that he wanted her to “fuck [him] like it’s [his ]last night in this world.” An embarrassed, angry Tyrion looks down as the crowd laughs. Tywin again shouts for silence.

In the void, Oberyn questions Shae: “And did you?” Shae is confused, and he explains that he wants to know if she did as Tyrion asked. There’s more laughter from the crowd, and Shae responds that she did all the things he wanted, providing lewd notions of what he did with her because she was his property, kept waiting in his chambers for hours so he could use her when he was bored.

She points out that he ordered her to call him “my lion”, and so she did so. She goes on, stating that he had her say “I am yours and you are mine,” as if they were wedded, and this too shocks the crowd. Tyrion, clearly distressed, pleads with Shae not to continue and Shae, looking back, says in a quavering voice, “I am a whore. Remember?” And so she turns back, resuming her testimony against him.

She claims that that was before his marriage to Sansa, but after that all he desired was her but she would not allow him into her bed, and that his promise to kill Joffrey was done to be able to sleep with her. The crowd goes louder in the wake of that accusation. Tyrion grates out that he wishes to confess.

After the crowd quiets, Tyrion turns to the crowd. He lets them know he saved them and their worthless lives when he saved the city. He wishes he had let Stannis kill them all. There’s a clamor of outrage, and Tywin asks if Tyrion is prepared to confess. Tyrion turns on his father, clearly angry and emotional. He admits he’s guilty… guilty not of killing Joffrey, but of a far more monstrous crime: being a dwarf. Tywin curtly responds he’s not on trial for being a dwarf, but Tyrion insists he is, and he has been for his entire life.

When Tywin presses on, asking if he has anything to say in his defense, Tyrion repeats he did not do it as he stares at his sister. He tells her, and the court, he did not kill Joffrey but that he wished he had. “Watching your vicious bastard die gave me more relief than 1,000 lying whores.” Tyrion turns back to the angry crowd, telling them he wishes he’s the monster they think he is, and that he had enough poison for all of them because he’d give his life gladly to watch them swallow it.

As the court shouts angrily, Tywin calls on Ser Meryn to take Tyrion to his cell. Then Tyrion shouts, announcing that he won’t give his life for Joffrey’s murder, and he knows there’s no justice there. He determines to let the gods decide his fate, and demands a trial by combat. The crowd is left in pandemonium, as “The Rains of Castamere” plays as the scene ends.

Recap Video

Recap

Seen from above, a galley enters the screen below, prow parting the waters as it sails along to its destination. Aboard are King Stannis and Ser Davos, both of them serious as they approach Braavos. As our view pulls back, we see the towering Titan of Braavos between whose legs the galley sails, and beyond the sprawling city in its sheltered lagoon. The scene shifts then to the inside of the Iron Bank of Braavos, where Stannis paces back and forth impatiently. He complains of having to wait since midday.

Davos replies that Easterners have a different sense of time, he’s found, and begins to launch into an anecdote of a smuggling run he and Salladhor Saan carried out. With a luck, Stannis silences him, still pacing. Suddenly the doors open and three bankers of the Iron Bank appear and sit at the table. The chief of them, Tycho Nestoris, welcomes Stannis and Davos. He invites Stannis to sit on the stone benches opposite his high seat. Stannis hesitates, clearly unhappy with sitting on a bench at a lower height than the enthroned bankers, but he does so.

Tycho asks what the bank can do for “Lord Stannis”, and Davos corrects him, giving Stannis his full style. Tycho responds that the Iron Throne is occupied by Tommen Baratheon, not Stannis. Stannis denies that Tommen is his kin, and Tycho claims he’s heard the tale from Tommen’s grandfather: a jealous uncle, an usurper, costing the Seven Kingdoms in blood and gold. Stannis notes that was gold that the Iron Bank loaned to Tywin. Tycho questions whether Stannis’s blood gives him a claim to the Iron Bank’s gold, and Stannis says it does: “More than any man living.”

The banker replies that the books of Westeros are filled with terms like “usurper”, “madman”, and “blood right.” The bank has books filled with numbers, whose stories they prefer as they are plainer and “less open to interpretation”. Tycho then asks what support Stannis has. Stannis names 4,000 soldiers, and Davos starts to number the ships when Tycho interjects and tells him to count those that are still afloat. Davos revises the number he was going to give to 32. Tycho then asks about the amount of food produced on Dragonstone to feed so many men, and Stannis admits none of it is.

At that Tycho explains that those numbers seem unlikely to give Stannis any hope, and so the bank declines Stannis’s request for support. Stannis stares at Davos, and then gets up and starts to depart. Davos addresses Tycho, saying, “My lord.” Tycho corrects him, noting he is not a lord… and in Braavos, Davos would not be one either as “thieves are not rewarded with titles” there. Davos confronts Tycho as Stannis looks away towards the exit. Davos notes he didn’t steal anything, as that’s what the pirates did; he just moved their goods. Then, removing the glove from his hand, he shows the missing fingers to Tycho and notes that that was the payment Stannis demanded for his crimes. as he puts his glove back on, he considers that an honest accounting, and Stannis is an honest man who is the bank’s best chance to get their loans to Westeros repaid since it must have cost a lot to help fund the Lannister wars.

Tycho claims the war is over, and Davos refutes him, noting the war continues while Stannis lives. Then Davos asks who’s the true power in King’s Landing, and Tycho responds Tywin, and at Davos’s prompting adds that Tywin is 67 years old. Davos seizes the chance and suggests that when Tywin dies, a half-grown boy born of incest might command, or Cersei who is despised by her own people, or Jaime Lannister who killed a king he’d sworn to protect. He asks again who the bank will look to when Tywin’s gone. Tycho suggests that’s a problem for the future, and Davos disagrees.

Pointing at Stannis, he notes that his king is the only reliable man left: he has the birthright, he’s in his prime, he’s an experienced battle commander. And then, holding up his hand again, he notes that Stannis also pays people back rather than just talking about it.

We shift to a bath house in Braavos, where naked prostitutes entertain bathers, male and female alike. A naked woman slips into the bath, joining a man, while at another pool the familiar figure of Salladhor Saan regales two prostitutes with a ribald jest, involving a captain calling for a red shirt whenever danger threatens, and always leading his men to victory. Davos enters the room, carrying a small case, and spotting his old friend makes his way to him without announcing himself. Standing behind him, he hears Salladhor tell of the captain looking out to see ten pirate ships surrounding his ship, and then shouting—

“Bring me my brown pants!” the two prostitutes call out, to Saan’s annoyance as they giggle. Davos then speaks, asking if Salladhor really thought they’d never met a pirate who didn’t share that shirt. Salladhor looks to him, surprised, and notes he’d heard Davos was rotting in a dungeon in Dragonstone. Davos replies he was only half-rotted. Salladhor Saan laughs, and offers his hand to Davos. He invites Davos to join him and the two prositutes naming one Lhara, and then the other speaks and note that she is the one named Lhara. Davos declines the invitation, noting that they’re to sail at sunset.

That puts Salladhor off, and he questions Davos. Davos repeats that he and Salladhor are going, and Salladhor scoffs and tells the women that once he thought Davos loved him, but now he knows that he despises him as he wants to see him die poor and alone. Davos throws the case down before Saan, who stops. The two exchange a look, and then he opens it to see stacks of coins bearing the mark of the Iron Bank. Davos notes that Saan will be neither alone nor poor, and then indicates that he left a chest of “the good stuff” at his home… but that he gave it to Saan’s wife. The women giggle, as Saan gives Davos a look and then says to him, “You are not my friend, my friend.”

At sea, Asha Greyjoy has the ironmen gathered as her ship sails on. She reads to them the letter Ramsay Snow sent to Pyke. As she speaks, we see into the Dreadfort, where Myranda loudly makes violent love to Ramsay, and then the ironborn rowing boats with Asha at the lead. Yara tells them of the horrors Ramsay committed on their countrymen and their prince, and that what’s been done to Theon has been done to them as well. She tells them that the word ironborn means nothing so long as Ramsay can hurt “our prince.” We see inside the Dreadfort again, Myranda screaming and moaning her pleasure as a grappling hook is thrown onto the walls.

A guard, hearing the noise, approaches to investigate and receives an axe in his head for his trouble. Asha climbs up and takes the axe. The ironborn spread out, overtaking guards. One guard Yara holds at knifepoint and asks for Theon Greyjoy. He tries to deny knowledge of it, but Asha insists he take her to the dungeons. He replies that he’s not in the dungeons… and we soon see that he’s kept in a cage in the kennels, among the castle’s hounds. Theon awakens when he hears fighting outside, where Asha has her hostage. The man directs her to the last cage, and she thanks him before slitting his throat with the blade of her axe.

She enters the kennel, as the hounds bark, and finds Theon cowering away from her. She identifies herself, and Theon insists she can’t trick him, insisting that he’s Reek and not Theon. Asha turns, calling on the ironman with her to help her. Theon struggles against them, denying who he is, screaming that he’s always been good, loyal Reek. As they struggle with him, Ramsay appears bare-chested, covered in blood, a knife and an axe in hand and with half a dozen Bolton soldiers beind him. The ironborn with Asha raise their childs, waiting. Ramsay smiles and says it’s turning into a lovely evening before charging into the fray, his men with him.

The fighting is brutal in the cramped space, and Asha can’t help as Theon struggles violently. Suddenly he bites her hand, and she’s forced to let go. He flees into his kennel, hiding in it. Asha plunges into the fight, slaying men, and managing with the surviving ironborn to force their way to the exit. The fighting pauses for a moment, and Asha demands Theon with the promise that no more men will need to die. Ramsay smirks and says she has “bigger balls” than her brother ever did. Sheathing his dagger, he wonders how fast she can run as he displays a key. And then he turns to the lock of one of the kennels. There’s a long moment as Asha stares.

We then see her and the survivors running to the boats. She commands them to make for the ship, and one questions her, asking about Theon. “My brother is dead,” she replies.

That night in the Dreadfort, Ramsay gives Theon a treat for his proof of devotion, showing Theon to a bath that he calls a reward. Theon insists that he didn’t want to be taken, that he was so frightened that they would. Ramsay moves up to Theon and tells him to remove his ragged clothing. He does so, pausing after removing his tunic (revealing a mass of scars all over his torso) but Ramsay insists everything else must go. Theon hesitates at that, btu does as he’s told. Ramsay look on his naked body and grins wickedly. Then pointing him to the tub, he watches as Theon stumbles into it, whimpering and then seeming amazed at the luxury of it.

Ramsay sits on the tub’s edge, and starts to scrub Theon’s back with a cloth. Ramsay asks if Theon loves him, and Theon says he does. Then Ramsay explains he needs Theon to do something for him: taking a castle that some “bad men” hold and which he wants to take back. Theon, confused, asks how. Ramsay explains he’ll play a role, to pretend he’s someone who he isn’t. Theon asks who, and Ramsay replies, “Theon Greyjoy.”

In far away Meereen, a goatherd and his son are out herding their goats. The boy, sitting, throws rocks to pass the time. Water splashes with each stone he throws, but then there’s a strange sound as a rock thuds. He stares in confusion… and then fear, as Daenerys’s black dragon flies up into view, screeching and hovering above him. The boy scrambles back, trying tor run. The dragon passes him by and unleashes his fire, roasting a goat alive before he grabs hold of the bleating, burning animal in his claws and flies away.

In Meereen proper, the goatherd awaits any audience with Daenerys. Missandei provides a lengthy style for Daenerys in the Valyrian of Meereen. Daenerys urges the goatherd to come forward with the bundle he carries. The man explains that he prayed for Daenerys’s victories over the slavers, for which Daenerys thanks him. He then lowers the bundle, and unwraps it to reveal the burnt remains of a goat. Missandei explains that the dragons were at fault, that they came for his flock and left him with nothing. Daenerys offers the man her condolences, and offers to pay three times the value of the goats to make it up to him. He bows and departs.

Then Daenerys calls for the next supplicant. The Meereenese nobleman Hizdahr zo Loraq is announced by a servant, but Daenerys informs him in a harsh tone that Hizdahr can address her himself. The nobleman moves forward and bows. He compliments her beauty, which makes her smile and she thanks him. He then explains that his family is one of the oldest and most prestigious in Meereen, that his father was beloved and did much to restore and maintain the greatest landmarks of the cities. This includes the pyramid Daenerys has commandeered. Daenerys smiles and says he has her gratitude, and that she would be honored to meet him.

Hizdahr replies, gravely, that she has: she crucified him. Her smile dies as he continues by saying that he hopes she’ll never live to see a kinsman treated so cruelly. Daenerys argues that his father crucified innocent children, and Hizdahr retorts that his father spoke against the act, calling it criminal, but that the other Masters overruled him. He then asks if it’s justice to answer one crime with another. Daenerys replies that she is sorry for the loss of his father… but then sternly adds that he would be wise to remember that what she did to the Masters was no crime.

Hizdahr replies that what is done is done. Raising his hands as if in supplication, he informs her that he is a servant of Meereen, one who wishes to see the traditions of his people maintained. Daenerys asks what traditions he wishes to keep. He explains that he wishes to adhere to the funeral customs of Meereen, including a proper burial in the Temple of the Graces. Daenerys seems surprised by the request. He notes that his father and 162 Meereenese are nailed to posts, carrion for vultures and rotting in the sun. Falling to his knees, he begs her to order the men take down and buried properly.

Daenerys angrily notes that the slave children were also left to rot in the sun, and if Hizdahr means to ask for their proper burial, as well. Hizdahr responds that he cannot defend what the masters did, but he can only speak as a son who loved his father and again begs that he be allowed to take down his father’s body and see him buried with dignity so that he “might find peace in the next world.” Daenerys considers Hizdahr, seemingly moved by his emotional plea. She then gives him leave to bury his father. He bows his head and thanks the queen. He rises and backs away before turning and departing.

Daenerys seems exhausted, wrung out emotionally, after that. She asks how many more supplicants, and Missandei replies that there are 212 remaining. Daenerys echoes the number, disbelieving, and then looks to Jorah. After a silente exchange, she tells Missandei to call in the next supplicant.

In King’s Landing, the small council meets with its latest additions among their number, Lord Mace Tyrell and Prince Oberyn Martell. Prince Oberyn, sitting very casually while Cersei remains standing and paces, hopes the meetings will not be so early all the time as he had been up late the previous night. There’s no response. He continues, asking if he’s now “master of something”, and wonders if it’s coins or ships.

Lord Tyrell, sitting on the other side of the table, interjects that Lord Tywin and he had decided that he would be Master of Ships a good while before. He’s interrupted when Lord Tywin enters, and he and the other small council members stand… except Oberyn, who remain seated, and Cersei, who never sat in the first place. Lord Tyrell begins to thank Tywin for the honor for having a seat on the council, but Tywin interrupts him as he sits down at the head of the table, noting that the trial begins in the afternoon, so they will only have that morning for important business.

Varys then informs the council of various items of news, such as the fact that Sandor Clegane has been seen in the riverlands, killing five Lannister soldiers and saying, “Fuck the king.” Cersei calls him a coward and traitor, and Pycelle regards his words as disgraceful. Tywin asks what it would cost to make a soldier stupid enough to try and kill or capture the Hound. Varys suggests ten stags, and Tywin raises it to a hundred.

Varys then adds there are more whispers from the east. Tywin asks if they have to do with the “Targaryen girl.” Varys states that Daenerys has conquered Meereen and rules it as a queen. Cersei questions how she conquered the city, and Varys replies that she has an army of 8,000 Unsullied, the Second Sons, two knights advising her in Barristan Selmy and Jorah Mormont… and three dragons. “Baby dragons,” Cersei responds, but Varys notes they grow bigger every year.

As Oberyn watches silently, Pycelle looks to Varys and says Mormont spies on Daenerys for them, but Varys notes that’s no longer the case—he seems fully devoted to her now. He adds that Barristan seems to have taken his dismissal from the Kingsguard “a bit harder than anticipated.” Cersei dismisses him as an old man, not fit to protect Joffrey. Tywin acerbically notes that he didn’t die on his watch. He calls the dismissal an insult, as well as stupid. Cersei dismisses Daenerys as a child far away across half the world, but Varys replies she has two seasoned warriors counseling her and an army at her back.

Oberyn chooses to speak up, noting that he has been to Essos and seen the Unsullied at first hand. “They are very impressive on the battlefield,” he notes, and then looking to Cersei adds, “Less so in the bedroom.” Tywin retorts that dragons have won no wars in 300 years, and that armies win them all the time. Then, he decides Daenerys must be dealt with. Pycelle questions how, and whether they’re to use force. Tywin says it may eventually come to it. But then asking Varys if his “little birds” can get into Meereen, Varys says they certainly can.

“Lord Tyrell, be a good man. Fetch my quill and paper,” Tywin says. Tyrell, treated as a servant, rises and gives as dignified and superior a look as he can to Oberyn before doing as he’s told.

Later, in the throne room, we see Varys looking at the empty Iron Throne. Beside him is the stand where the accused will be placed during the trial. Oberyn approaches and leans on the stands. They greet one another. “Lord Varys,” Oberyn starts, leaving it hanging as if looking for Varys to provide a last name. “Only Varys,” the eunuch replies. “I’m not actually a nobleman.” Varys remarks that Oberyn seems very knowledgeable about the Unsullied, and asks if he spent much time in Essos.

Oberyn replies he was there for five years, and when Varys asks why, Oberyn says it’s a big and beautiful world, and that most simply live and die in a little corner of the world. “Most of us aren’t princes,” Varys replies. Oberyn looks at him, and then chuckles. He asks if Varys if from Lys. Varys seems surprised, and Oberyn says he has a gift for accents. Varys stonily responds he’s lost his accent, and Oberyn dismissively responds that he has a gift for that, too.

When Oberyn asks how he came to Westeros, Varys says it’s been a long story, and Oberyn assumes it’s one that he doesn’t like telling people. Varys suggests he’d share with people he trusts. Oberyn approaches Varys then and suggests that his paramour Ellaria would find him very interesting, and that she should come to the brothel and meet her. “We brought our on wine, not the swill they serve her,” he adds as an inducement, and notes as well that there are lovely boys on retainer… He stops, noticing Varys’s impression. Oberyn is surprised, assuming Varys liked boys before he was cut.

Varys silently shakes his head. Oberyn then supposes he was interested in girls, and asks him to forgive him when he says he never would have guessed. Varys takes no offense… but he notes he wasn’t interested in girls, either. He wasn’t interested in anything, really. Oberyn doubts it, but Varys says he’s very glad to have no part in desire, after having seen what it does to the kingdom. And in any case, he adds, the absence of desire allows him to pursue other things. Oberyn asks what those might be. Varys doesn’t answer at first… then directs his gaze to the Iron Throne. Oberyn looks to it, and then Varys as Varys walks away.

Outside Tyrion’s cell, Jaime has the door opened. Tyrion, seated on a bench, stands and guesses he’s been pardoned. Jaime says nothing, clearly troubled by having to do this task. He nods to the watchmen with him and they come around to put Tyrion in fetters. The Imp asks, “Really?” Jaime replies that it’s their father’s orders, and Tyrion says it wouldn’t do to disappoint him.

Marched down the length of the throne room, between two rows of stands packed with courtiers, Tyrion is placed in the accused’s box. His chains are attached to it. King Tommen, seated on the Iron Throne, stands. The rest of the court stands as well. He recuses himself from the trial, and leaves his grandfather to judge in his name, as well as Prince Oberyn and Lord Mace. He adds that if Tyrion is found guilty, may the gods punish the accused. Tyrion, having heard that last with eyes closed, opens them again and nods slightly Tommen before the king leaves escorted by two Kingsguard.

The judges take their seats, with Tywin on the Iron Throne itself. Tywin questions Tyrion if he or Sansa killed Joffrey. Tyrion denies it. When Tywin asks how Tyrion would characterize his death, Tyrion suggests that Joffrey choked on his pigeon pie. Jaime shoots his brother a distressed look, and Tywin asks if Tyrion means to blame the bakers. “Or the pigeons. Just leave me out of it,” Tyrion responds. Tyrion looks at the crowd murmurs at Tyrion’s levity.

Then Tywin announces his first witness. We see Tyrion slouched in his back as Ser Meryn Trant of the Kingsguard recounts the riot in King’s Landing, where Tyrion slapped Joffrey and insulted him. Meryn notes it was not the first threat he delivered to Joffrey, recounting when Tyrion marched up to the throne and called his nephew a halfwit and suggested that he could meet the same fate as Aerys, the Mad King. Trant notes that Tyrion threatened to have him killed as well, when he spoke in Joffrey’s defense. Tyrion, unable to take it anymore, sarcastically asks why he doesn’t tell them what Joffrey was doing at the time.

Tywin demands silence, but Tyrion presses on about Joffrey aiming his crossbow at Sansa Stark after Trant tore her clothing and beat her. Tywin shouts for silence again, and commands Tyrion to not speak unless called upon. Tywin then dismisses Trant, who gives Tyrion a dirty look as he passes him by. We then find Grand Maester Pycelle reading out a lengthy list of poisons in his possession. Oberyn interrupts him, suggesting they understand that he has many poisons. “Had,” Pycelle replies. He claims Tyrion looted his stores, glaring at Tyrion as he speaks, and Tyrion looks put out.

Tywin then asks if Pycelle will confirm that Joffrey was without a doubt poisoned. Pycelle says yes, and then reveals the necklace Sansa had. He states it was found on the body of Dontos Hollard, who was last seen spiriting away Sansa. He notes the necklace, worn on the day of the wedding, has a residue of a very rare and terrible poison called the Strangler. When Tywin asks if it was among his stores, Pycelle says it was, and declares that it was a poison few possess that was used to “strike down the most noble child the gods ever put on this good earth.” He glares at Tyrion as he says it, and Tyrion looks to the floor as the crowd murmurs.

Then it’s Cersei’s turn to testify against Tyrion, quoting his promise to hurt her and turn all her joy to ashes to pay a debt. Mace Tyrell seems dumbfounded, asks her to confirm that Tyrion said it. Cersei nods, and indicates that it was before the battle of Blackwater Bay when she confronted him about his plans to put Joffrey on the front lines. She claims—falsely—that Joffrey insisted on remaining on the battlements. Tyrion holds his head in his hand as she speaks.

Oberyn asks her to explain what the “debt” was, and Cersei replies that she had found out he had been keeping whores in the Tower of the Hand. Demurely, she claims she asked him to confine his “salacious acts” to brothels, and he was angry at her for it.  Mace Tyrell ponderously thanks Cersei for the courage of her testimony. Then we see Varys is the next witness, and Lord Tyrell asks him about the precise threat Tyrion spoke to Joffrey on one occasion. Varys does so, quoting it word for word.

Mace asks him to confirm that Tyrion dared to say such a thing in the small council, and Varys does so, adding that Tyrion did not seem pleased with the news of Robb Stark’s death. He speculates aloud that his marriage to Sansa may have made him sympathetic to the northern cause. The crowd murmurs at that, shocked by the notion. Tywin dismisses Varys, but when Tyrion asks permission to put one question to Varys, Tywin allows it. Tyrion states that Varys once told him that without him, the city would have fallen, but that the histories would not credit him… but also that Varys himself would not forget. “Have you forgotten, Lord Varys?” he asks.

“Sadly, my lord,” Varys replies, “I never forget a thing.” He leaves then, after a bow. Tywin adjourns the trial for now, calling it to resume in an hour’s time. Guards clear the room as everyone rises. Cersei and Jaime exchange a glance. All leave, except Tyrion, who remains in his chains.

In Tywin’s chambers, Jaime approaches his father and asks if he really means to condemn his own son to death. Tywin points out that the trial is not over, and that he has condemned no one. Jaime calls it a farce rather than a trial, that Cersei has manipulated everything and he knows it. “I know nothing of the sort,” Tywin says in response to that accusation.  Jaime insists Tywin has always hated Tyrion, but Tywin insists in turn that Tyrion killed Joffrey.

“As did I,” Jaime notes. Then he points out to his father what Aerys’s last command was: to bring him Tywin’s head. He cannot believe that he saved his father’s life just to watch that father murder his own brother. Tywin is unmoved: it’s justice, not murder. Jaime is incredulous at the idea. Tywin goes on, stating he’s only doing his sworn duty as Hand, and that if Tyrion is found guilty, he will be punished accordingly. At that, Jaime notes that he’ll be executed. Tywin raises his voice, insisting that he’ll be punished appropriately.

Jaime changes tack, reminding his father that family is all that lives on, and that he dreamed of a dynasty that would last a thousand years. But what happens to that dynasty, he asks, when Tyrion dies? Jaime is a Kingsguard, and will not carry on the family line. Tywin curtly says he remembers Jaime’s oath. Jaime presses on, asking who’ll carry the lion banner into future banners? His nephews, like Lancel and others whose names he doesn’t remember?

Tywin retorts with his own question, asking what happens to the dynasty if he spares his grandson’s killer. Jaime has his answer: it will survive through him; he’ll leave the Kingsguard and assume his place as heir, if Tywin allows Tyrion to live.  “Done,” Tywin says with such alacrity that Jaime is visibly dumbfounded.

Tywin explains that if Tyrion pleads for mercy once the guilty verdict is rendered, he will be permitted to pleased for mercy at which time he’ll be allowed to take the black and join the Night’s Watch. Then, when that happens, Tywin expects Jaime to return to Casterly Rock after removing his white cloak, to marry a suitable woman and “father children named Lannister.” He adds that Jaime will also never turn his back on his family again. Jaime hesitates a long moment, and then swears to do it. Tywin gives his word as well. Father and son stare at one another. Then the bell sounds, and Jaime departs. Tywin sits back and finishes his glass of wine.

Marching into the throne room as the stands begin to fill, Jaime goes to Tyrion. Tyrion morbidly quips that it’s not going very well, but Jaime informs him of his arrangement with Tywin that will allow Tyrion to live. Tyrion notes Ned Stark was promised the same thing, but Jaime insists Tywin is not Joffrey and will keep his word. Tyrion asks how he knows, as they both look on the judges mounting the dais.  The crowd stands then, and Jaime tells Tyrion to trust him, to keep his mouth shut, and this will all be over soon.

Then the next witness is called, as Cersei looks at Tyrion. It’s Shae. Tyrion is stunned to see her approaching, while Jaime looks confused and uncertain. Shae mounts the witnesses stand under the eyes of the judges. After identifying herself, she swears to speak truthfully. When Tywin asks if she knows Tyrion, the two look at one another and then she turns back to say that she does. Indicating she is handmaiden to his wife Sansa, she states that she knows Tyrion is guilty. Tyrion sits back, thunderstruck, as the crowd reacts with surprise as she presses on and states that he planned the murder with Sansa.

Tywin calls for silence, and Shae presses on saying that Sansa wanted revenge for her family, whose deaths she blamed on Joffrey. As she speaks, we see that Cersei is staring at Tyrion. Shae adds that Tyrion was pleased to help, because he hated Joffrey, the queen, and Tywin as well. She confirms his theft of Pycelle’s poisons to place in the king’s wine—we see Margaery seems disturbed by this testimony. Oberyn questions how Shae could know all this… and she replies that she was not just a handmaid, she was Tyrion’s whore. The crowd murmurs again, shocked.

Mace Tyrell can hardly believe it, and asks her to repeat herself. After she states again that she was Tyrion’s whore, Tywin asks how he came into Tyrion’s service. She replies that he stole her from a knight in Tywin’s host, using his cutthroats to take her away after breaking the knight’s arm. She quotes him, stating that he said he owned her and that he wanted her to “fuck [him] like it’s [his ]last night in this world.” An embarrassed, angry Tyrion looks down as the crowd laughs. Tywin again shouts for silence.

In the void, Oberyn questions Shae: “And did you?” Shae is confused, and he explains that he wants to know if she did as Tyrion asked. There’s more laughter from the crowd, and Shae responds that she did all the things he wanted, providing lewd notions of what he did with her because she was his property, kept waiting in his chambers for hours so he could use her when he was bored.

She points out that he ordered her to call him “my lion”, and so she did so. She goes on, stating that he had her say “I am yours and you are mine,” as if they were wedded, and this too shocks the crowd. Tyrion, clearly distressed, pleads with Shae not to continue and Shae, looking back, says in a quavering voice, “I am a whore. Remember?” And so she turns back, resuming her testimony against him.

She claims that that was before his marriage to Sansa, but after that all he desired was her but she would not allow him into her bed, and that his promise to kill Joffrey was done to be able to sleep with her. The crowd goes louder in the wake of that accusation. Tyrion grates out that he wishes to confess.

After the crowd quiets, Tyrion turns to the crowd. He lets them know he saved them and their worthless lives when he saved the city. He wishes he had let Stannis kill them all. There’s a clamor of outrage, and Tywin asks if Tyrion is prepared to confess. Tyrion turns on his father, clearly angry and emotional. He admits he’s guilty… guilty not of killing Joffrey, but of a far more monstrous crime: being a dwarf. Tywin curtly responds he’s not on trial for being a dwarf, but Tyrion insists he is, and he has been for his entire life.

When Tywin presses on, asking if he has anything to say in his defense, Tyrion repeats he did not do it as he stares at his sister. He tells her, and the court, he did not kill Joffrey but that he wished he had. “Watching your vicious bastard die gave me more relief than 1,000 lying whores.” Tyrion turns back to the angry crowd, telling them he wishes he’s the monster they think he is, and that he had enough poison for all of them because he’d give his life gladly to watch them swallow it.

As the court shouts angrily, Tywin calls on Ser Meryn to take Tyrion to his cell. Then Tyrion shouts, announcing that he won’t give his life for Joffrey’s murder, and he knows there’s no justice there. He determines to let the gods decide his fate, and demands a trial by combat. The crowd is left in pandemonium, as “The Rains of Castamere” plays as the scene ends.

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