Blood of Dragons: Tidings

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Sites of Interest
An Embassy Ends
IC Date: Day 20 of Month 8, 165 AC
RL Date: April 11, 2014.

In the wake of the mysterious assassination of Tybio Erosenes in the Sealord’s own palace, the Sealord’s justiciars and guards searched high and low for the culprit. Witnesses were questioned, offers of aid were rejected, interviews were arranged, but to no apparent result. The Secret City keeps its secrets even from the Sealord of Braavos, it seems. And from dragon princes from Westeros, too, as it was well-known that Prince Aegon Targaryen has been spurring on the investigation, had even attempted to have certain men questioned until the Sealord’s guard intervened and prevented it. Down at Ragman’s Harbor it’s claimed that the prince—sometimes with Bellegre Otharys in tow—had been speaking to certain unsavory men and women, people with dark and bloody reputations, and many suspected he had hopes of using such people to force a confession out of… someone.

Perhaps a specific someone, however, or group of someones: for the Sealord’s guard made note of common men hovering about the manse where the Dornish emissaries were resident, and the same guard reported rumors coming to them that certain inducements have been offered to any man who helps avenge the murder of the Erosenes scion… provided that vengeance was aimned at the Dornishmen. It’s no great surprise that Prince Aegon had fixated on the Dornish emissaries, after the war between them in past years, and the fact that the Dornish prince who lead the embassy (in name, at least) personally killed his cousin and king. But that he would go so far? It was worrying.

And that worry, it must be said, had an effect in the Sealord’s Palace. A high official of the court, near to the Sealord Donalo, was seen arriving at the manse two days ago, escorted by the Sealord’s guard and the Second Sword. What transpired in the meeting between them was not at first clear. But that evening, after no Dornishmen had been seen out of the manse’s grounds, nor any other soul beside, activity began: servants beginning to carry chests out into the yard, men rushing out to contact the canal guilds to arrange barges, a bevy of bravos and sellswords guarding the gates.

The Dornishmen, clearly, were preparing to leave. And two days later, they mounted galleys—escorted by a heavy contingent of guards—and put out to sea, departing to the land whence they came

And what of their embassy, their effort to persuade Braavos to join them and Pentos against Lys over control of the Stepstones, a conflict that already hampers trade in the narrow sea? In the halls and chambers of the Sealord’s palace, it became clear that Donalo had dismissed the idea of Braavos becoming involved at all in the affairs of Lys and Pentos, preferring to remain aloof. For those who know the desires of Baelor’s Hand, Prince Viserys, this would be a victory. But for Prince Aegon, who has grown so fond of the charms of Braavos (or, at least, the charms of one particular denizen)?

All the courtiers and lords in Braavos know that he pressed for more than that, for Braavos to join Lys and the Iron Throne against Pentos and Dorne; if the Sealord has rejected that as well, it’s a failure for the prince. Which may explain why men scurry back and forth between the prince’s manse and the Sealord’s palace, attempting to achieve Prince Aegon’s desire for glory and riches.