The Citadel: Concordance

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2.8. Food, Drink, and Eating
  • Summerwine is red, with a sweet and fruity flavor (I: 12, 41)
  • Roasted meats (I: 41)
  • Fresh bread (I: 41)
  • Pewter cups and mugs (I: 41)
  • Honeyed chicken (I: 43)
  • Roasted onions, dripped in gravy (I: 44)
  • Trenchers (I: 44)
  • Spiced wine (I: 46)
  • Beer (I: 74, etc.)
  • Honeyed duck (I: 82)
  • Sausage (I: 84)
  • Pastries (I: 84)
  • Honeyed wine (I: 84)
  • Blackberry preserves (I: 113)
  • Mint tea (I: 113)
  • Soft-boiled eggs (I: 113)
  • Bacon (I: 113)
  • Lemon cakes (I: 119)
  • Crab (I: 171)
  • Pomegranate (I: 172)
  • Sweet pumpkin soup (I: 181)
  • Ribs roasted in a crust of garlic and herbs (I: 181)
  • Suckling pig (I: 208)
  • Pigeon pie (I: 208)
  • Turnips soaked in butter (I: 208)
  • Dates (I: 211)
  • Iced milk sweetened with honey (I: 211)
  • Pork pie (I: 223)
  • Blueberry tarts (I: 225)
  • Blood melons (I: 234)
  • Silver goblets (I: 235)
  • Sweetgrass (I: 250)
  • Strawberries (I: 250)
  • Salads of sweetgrass, spinach, and plums (I: 251)
  • Sweetbreads (I: 251)
  • Trout baked in claw (I: 251)
  • Snails in honey and garlic (I: 251)
  • Thick soup of barley and venison (I: 251)
  • Baked apples fragrant with cinnamon (I: 251)
  • Lemon cakes frosted in sugar (I: 251)
  • Pepper (I: 257)
  • Drinking horns (I: 257, etc.)
  • Dark, strong beer (I: 259)
  • Black bread (I: 261)
  • Boiled goose eggs (I: 261)
  • Oranges (I: 261)
  • Lamprey pie (I: 299)
  • Mead (I: 327)
  • Boiled beans (I: 343)
  • Dish of peas and onions (I: 343)
  • Pitchers of cream (I: 362)
  • Sweet orange-scented wine (I: 362)
  • Sour red wine (I: 371)
  • Rack-of-lamb baked in garlic and herbs, garnished with mint (I: 372)
  • Mashed yellow turnips in butter (I: 372)
  • Salads of spinach, chickpeas, and turnip greens (I: 372)
  • Iced blueberries and sweet cream (I: 372)
  • Strawberry pies (I: 396)
  • Blood oranges (I: 397)
  • Porridge (I: 397)
  • Boar with an apple in its mouth, skin seared crisp (I: 422)
  • Applecakes (I: 430)
  • Blood sausage (I: 431)
  • Sweet Dornish summerwines (I: 492)
  • Dry red wine from the Arbor (I: 492)
  • Garlic sausage (I: 566)
  • Apricot tarts (I: 599)
  • Cherries (I: 602)
  • Buttermilk (I: 623)
  • Sweet biscuits (I: 623)
  • Beef-and-bacon pies (I: 647)
  • Boiled eggs (I: 652)
  • Ham steak (I: 652)
  • Plums (I: 652)
  • Lemon in beer (I: 652)
  • Salted beef (THK: 464)
  • Fried bread (THK: 489)
  • Pease porridge (THK: 504. TSS: 120)
  • Salt fish (II: 9)
  • Fish stew (II: 17)
  • Boar cooked with apples and mushrooms (II: 45)
  • Honeycomb (II: 58)
  • Oxtail soup (II: 90)
  • Summer greens tossed with pecans (II: 90)
  • Red fennel (II: 90)
  • Crumbled cheese (II: 91)
  • Crab pie (II: 91)
  • Spiced squash (II: 91)
  • Quails drowned in butter (II: 91)
  • Wheels of cheese (II: 102)
  • Sweetcorn eaten on the cob (II: 103)
  • Minced lamb with pepper (II: 115)
  • Oatmeal (II: 123)
  • Peppercrab stew (II: 124)
  • Salt cod (II: 124)
  • Capon (II: 183)
  • Brown oatbread (II: 183)
  • Stewed plums (II: 192)
  • Stuffed goose sauced with mulberries (II: 195)
  • Cream stews (II: 195)
  • Potted hare (II: 199)
  • Acorn paste that tastes awful, but can be eaten at need (II: 214)
  • Wine sweetened with honey and fragrant with cinnamon and cloves (II: 238)
  • Auroch joints roasted with leeks (II: 238)
  • Venison pies chunky with carrots, bacon, and mushrooms (II: 238)
  • Mutton chops sauced in honey and cloves (II: 238)
  • Peppered boar (II: 238)
  • Skewers of pigeon and capon (II: 238)
  • Beef-and-barley stew (II: 238)
  • Cold fruit soup (II: 238)
  • Whitefish and winkles, crabs and mussels, clams, herring, salmon, lobster, and lampreys are all eaten (II: 238)
  • Oat biscuits (II: 238)
  • Beets (II: 238)
  • Berry tarts (II: 238)
  • Pears poached in strongwine (II: 238, 255)
  • Wheels of white cheese (II: 238)
  • Chilled autumn ale (II: 238)
  • Goose-in-berries (II: 239)
  • Nettle tea (II: 246)
  • Tiny, savory fish rolled in salt and cooked crisp (II: 255)
  • Capons stuffed with onions and mushrooms (II: 255)
  • Venison stewed with beef and barley (II: 255)
  • Pastries, cream swans, spun-sugar unicorns, spiced honey biscuits, and apple crisps served as desert (II: 255)
  • Dinnerware such as gravy boats exist (II: 256)
  • Leg of lamb, sauced with mint and honey and cloves (II: 270)
  • Onion pie (II: 289)
  • Pigeon pie (II: 325, 576)
  • The extremely poor will eat whatever is necessary to survival - including dead cats (II: 330)
  • Barley stews with bits of carrot and turnip (II: 334)
  • Cinnamon, nutmeg, honey, raisins, nuts, and dried berries are used in hot spiced wine. Some southrons use lemons as well, but some consider this heresy (II: 374)
  • Some men put lemon in their morning beer (II: 374)
  • Ripe blue cheese (II: 404)
  • Oatcakes (II: 405)
  • The Arbor is said to make the finest wines in the world (II: 423)
  • Soups made of roots (II: 458)
  • Roasted rabbit basted with honey (II: 501)
  • An example of a breakfast: porridge, honey, milk, boiled eggs, and crisp fried fish (II: 555)
  • Creamy chestnut soup (II: 565)
  • Greens dressed with apples and pine nuts (II: 565)
  • Honeyed ham (II: 565)
  • Buttered carrots (II: 565)
  • White beans and bacon (II: 565)
  • Roast swan stuffed with mushrooms and oysters (II: 565)
  • Trout wrapped in bacon (II: 572)
  • Salad of turnip greens, red fennel, and sweetgrass (II: 572)
  • A golden vintage of wine from the Arbor, rich and fruity (II: 617)
  • Mutton roasted with leeks and carrots (II: 620)
  • Sweet plum wine (II: 621)
  • Barley bread (II: 655. III: 190. TSS: 116)
  • Peaches in honey (II: 669)
  • Pale amber wine (II: 686)
  • Hardbread (III: 121)
  • Oatcakes (III: 121)
  • Cider (III: 123)
  • Smoked salt fish (III: 125)
  • Molasses (III: 136)
  • A wedding feast of seventy-seven courses (III: 139)
  • A great wedding pie with a hundred live doves baked within to fly out when the crust is broken (III: 139)
  • Squab (III: 145)
  • A fine page's doublet (III: 145)
  • Duck with lemons, which may be a Dornish recipe (III: 148)
  • Fowl are hung outdoors for a few days before cooking (III: 149)
  • Lemons, olives, and pomegranates come chiefly from Dorne (III: 149)
  • Rabbit roasted on a spit (III: 149)
  • Rabbit stewed with ale and onions (III: 149)
  • Honeyed wine (III: 182)
  • Dried apples (III: 190)
  • Boar's ribs (III: 233)
  • Stewed onions (III: 233)
  • Mutton and mushrooms (III: 252)
  • Pease pudding (III: 252)
  • Baked apples with yellow cheese (III: 252)
  • Eels (III: 274)
  • Cakes with pinenuts baked in them (III: 277)
  • Blackberry cakes (III: 277)
  • Broth with chunks of whitefish, carrots, and onion (III: 286)
  • Meat and mash (III: 286)
  • Fish stew (III: 286)
  • Lamprey pie (III: 286)
  • The wine from the Arbor is known as Arbor gold (III: 323)
  • Pork crackling (III: 324)
  • Six coppers for a melon, a silver stag for a bushel of corn, and a gold dragon for a side of beef or six skinny piglets are all shockingly high prices (III: 354)
  • Thick cream of wheat with honey and butter (III: 372)
  • Dried berries (III: 377)
  • Beef-and-bacon pie (III: 404)
  • Hippocras (III: 421)
  • Prunes (III: 422)
  • Dornish tastes in food and wine are markedly different from those of the Seven Kingdoms, preferring hot spicy meals and strong wine without much sweetness (III: 434)
  • Mashed turnips (III: 449)
  • A bowl of venison stewed with onions (III: 530)
  • Sweet cakes (III: 533)
  • Casks of salt pork (III: 568)
  • Casks of pickled pigs' feet (III: 568)
  • Leek soup (III: 574)
  • Salad of green beans, onions, and beets (III: 574)
  • River pike poached in almond milk (III: 574)
  • Jellied calves' brains (III: 575)
  • A leche of string beef (III: 575)
  • Barrels of salt mutton (III: 612)
  • Iced wine (III: 614)
  • Buns with raisins, bits of dried apple, and pine nuts within (III: 614, 615)
  • Mutton cooked in a thick broth of ale and onions (III: 616)
  • Honeycakes baked with blackberries and nuts (III: 661)
  • Gammon steaks (III: 661)
  • Fingerfish crisped in breadcrumbs (III: 661)
  • Autumn pears (III: 661)
  • A Dornish dish of onions, cheese, and chopped eggs cooked with fiery peppers (III: 661)
  • A creamy soup of mushrooms and buttered snails (III: 674)
  • A pastry coffyn filled with pork, pine nuts, and eggs (III: 675)
  • Sweetcorn fritters (III: 676)
  • Oatbread baked with bits of date, apple, and orange (III: 676)
  • Trout cooked in a crust of crushed almonds (III: 676)
  • Roast herons (III: 676)
  • Cheese-and-onion pies (III: 676)
  • Crabs boiled in fiery eastern spices (III: 676)
  • Trenchers filled with chunks of chopped muton stewed in almond milk with carrots, raisins, and onions (III: 676)
  • Fish tarts (III: 676)
  • Honey-ginger partridge (III: 676)
  • Peacocks served in their plumage, roasted whole and stuffed with dates (III: 676)
  • Blandissory, a mixture of beef broth and boiled wine sweetened with honey and dotted with blanched almonds and chunks of capon (III: 677)
  • Buttered pease, chopped nuts, and slivers of swan poached in a sauce of saffron and peaches (III: 677)
  • Roundels of elk stuffed with ripe blue cheese (III: 678)
  • A leche of brawn, spiced with cinnamon, cloves, sugar, and almond milk (III: 678)
  • Hot, spiced pigeon pie covered with a lemon cream (III: 682)
  • Cups of onion broth (III: 718)
  • Dornish plums so dark as to be almost black (III: 743)
  • Gulls' eggs and seaweed soup are eaten by poorer people in coastal areas (III: 765)
  • Claret (TSS: 92)
  • Blackberries in cream (TSS: 147)
  • Suckling pig in plum sauce, stuffed with chestnuts and white truffles (IV: 7)
  • A Dornish meal of purple olives, with flatbread, cheese, and chickpea paste (IV: 36)
  • Heavy strongwine, apparently favored in Dorne (IV: 36)
  • Gull’s eggs diced with bits of ham and fiery peppers (IV: 37)
  • Water mixed with lemon squeezings (IV: 47)
  • A wayfarer's meal of roast squirrel, acorn paste, and pickles (IV: 62)
  • A cup of goat's milk (IV: 68)
  • Bean-and-bacon soup (IV: 71)
  • Hot crab stew (IV: 136)
  • Mustard from Oldtown in a stone jar (IV: 161)
  • A breakfast of two boiled eggs, a loaf of bread, and a pot of honey (IV: 172)
  • Dornish food is very spicy. One delicacy is grilled snake meat, served with a fiery snake sauce featuring mustard seeds, dragon peppers, and even a drop of snake venom (IV: 186)
  • Salted ham (IV: 200)
  • The crew of a Night's Watch galley might eat oat porridge in the morning, pease porridge in the afternoon, and salt beef, salt cod, and salt mutton washed down with ale in the evening (IV: 219)
  • Unsweetened lemonwater (IV: 300)
  • A Dornish meal of dates, cheese, and olives, with lemonsweet to drink (IV: 303)
  • Sweetwine, which the orphans of the Greenblood drink (IV: 309)
  • Various kinds of sweets: cakes and pies, jams and jellies, and honey on the comb (IV: 333)
  • Sharp white cheese and a smelly blue cheese (IV: 333)
  • Nutmeg is a costly spice (IV: 338)
  • A meal of buttered beets, hot-baked bread, herb-crusted pike, and ribs of wild boar washed down with hippocras (IV: 360)
  • Oranges are rare and costly for the smallfolk (IV: 372)
  • Roast ox, stuffed ducks, and buckets of fresh crabs (IV: 438)
  • River pike baked in a crust of herbs and crushed nuts (IV: 452)
  • Sweet cider (IV: 465)
  • Thick stews of mussels, crabs, and three kinds of fish (IV: 467)
  • Spiced rum from the Summer Isles, rare in Westeros (IV: 520)
  • Boiled beef with horseradish (IV: 530)
  • A breakfast of fried eggs, fried bread, bacon, and blood oranges (IV: 543)
  • Ham studded with cloves and basted with honey and dried cherries (IV: 578)
  • Baked apples with sharp white cheese (IV: 578)
  • A Dornish meal of kid roasted with lemon and honey, and grape leaves stuffed with a mixture of raisins, onions, mushrooms, and fiery dragon peppers (IV: 589)
  • Favorite foods of a Dornish noblewoman might include figs, olives, or peppers stuffed with cheese (IV: 591)
  • A Dornish breakfast of spiced eggs (IV: 591)
  • Berries and cream (IV: 606)
  • A meal of mushroom soup, venison, and cakes (IV: 608)
  • A hot meal of stewed goat and onions (IV: 622)
  • Frogs caught at the Weeping Dock in the Citadel, by a cook's boy (IV: 677)
  • Well-peppered wild boar with onions, mushrooms, and mashed neeps (TMK: 660)
  • At the high table during a wedding feast: suckling pig, a peacock roasted in its plumage, a pike crusted with crushed almonds. Below the salt: salt pork soaked in almond milk and peppered, capons stuffed with onions, herbs, mushrooms, and roasted chedstnuts, flaky white cod in a pastry coffyn with a brown sauce, as well as pease porridge, buttered turnips, carrots drizzled wih honey, and ripe white cheese with a strong smell (TMK: 674-675)
  • Wine is made in the riverlands (TMK: 679)
  • Barley beer (TMK: 687)
  • A breakfast of boiled eggs, black sausage, and apples stewed with prunes (V: 47)
  • Stuffing of chopped prunes and carrots in a hen (V: 47)
  • Goat's milk as a substitute for mother's milk for an infant (V: 56)